Connecticut Employment Law Blog Insight on Labor & Employment Developments for Connecticut Businesses

Quick Hits: Paycheck Fairness Act, CHRO, Employee Misclassification, Amara v. CIGNA followup

Posted in CHRO & EEOC, Discrimination & Harassment, Human Resources (HR) Compliance, Legislative Developments, Wage & Hour

It’s a big holiday today. So, let me be the first to say: Happy Evacuation Day — at least to my fellow blogger at Compliance Building.  To everyone else, a Happy St. Patrick’s Day

Its been some time since my last look around the employment law universe, so here’s some quick hits of what else has been going on this month:

Another feature of the CHRO is its generous and unproductive employee work schedules. I remember getting steamed one time during a fact-finding investigation when we were told we’d have to come back on another day to finish up, even though it was mid-afternoon and we were but two hours away from concluding the evidence. The investigator had one of those democratic work schedules that allowed her to skip out in mid-afternoon to attend to one of her kids. I was forced to schlep to Waterbury again. Thousands more in fees on both sides because a normal work day is anathema to liberals.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court has asked for the Solicitor General’s views on the Connecticut case of Amara v. CIGNA, a significant case I’ve discussed at length before that discusses what the obligations are to make disclosures of changes to a pension plan. The Supreme Court is presently considering petitions from the company and the group of former employees that brought suit to take the matter.  A decision from the Supreme Court on whether to accept the petitions is expected by June 2010.
     
  • Finally, are you looking for some new labor & employment law blogs to add to your reading list? The Workplace Prof blog recently compiled a list of such blogs.  It contains many of my must-reads in the morning. Take a peek. 
  • http://www.ComplianceBuilding.com Doug Cornelius

    Evacuation Day became a holiday first. (Sort of.)
    Mass. made it an official holiday in 1901. Ireland did not make St. Patrick’s day a a holiday until 1903. Of course it was celebrate for centuries before that.