With Hanukkah tonight, and Thanksgiving tomorrow, (or “Thanksgivukkah” as some have called it humorously),  here are a few morsels of employment law information to get you started.

And finally, Robin Shea has a marvelous post about the 8 employment law things to be thankful for on “Thanksgivukkah”.  Don’t miss it.

Stay dry from the rain today, Connecticut. Have a great Thanksgiving everyone and see you with new posts next week.

As most of us have other things in mind this week (and in light of some technical issues we’re having on the backend of the blog), the Connecticut Employment Law Blog is taking a few days off to prepare for and celebrate Thanksgiving.  It’s one of my favorite holidays of the year and there is much cooking left to be done in our household.

All the blog posts you have come to love will be back again on Monday.

I’m thankful for all the support and loyal readership over the years and extend my sincere gratitude to you.

Wishing you all a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving Day is a day for reflection and pause.  And while my post last year pointed out a number of excellent posts on the subject (including a repeat of Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Thanksgiving Day speech), this year I’m going to take a different and simpler path.

I wanted to take a moment to give thanks to my family and friends, my fellow workers at my lawfirm (Pullman & Comley), and you the reader.  2009 has certainly had its challenges, but when all is said and done, there’s still so much to be thankful and grateful for.

I wish you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving.

 

On this Thanksgiving Day, let’s be honest and straightforward for a moment — lawyers can be awfully defensive about the type of work we do. Indeed, some lawyers and judges are offended by the notion of "lawyer jokes".  I can vividly recall a speech given by then-Connecticut Supreme Court Justice William Sullivan at an Annual Meeting of the Connecticut Bar Association six years ago when he told the audience that lawyers need to put an end to lawyer jokes.

We need to take pride not only in the profession, but in all its members. We need to take an active role in helping and encouraging our newest attorneys. We need to consciously reduce the level of antagonism that legal arguments incorporate. We need to enhance, not detract from the profession as a whole. We need to speak up – civilly – when those outside the profession unfairly attack and criticize. We need to make the public aware that the art of negotiation, not confrontation, is central to us . . . That mediation often best reflects the wisdom that lawyers have learned through experience. We need to stop being agreeable to the telling of those insufferable lawyer jokes.

If that’s the case, what should we make out of this sing-a-long song by Mark Toth, Chief Legal Officer of Manpower?

So, on this Thanksgiving day, let’s all take a deep breath, smile and, perhaps even laugh.  Even when things are difficult, there is always something to be thankful for — whether family, health, work, etc. 

This four-day weekend for most is a good time to regroup — which includes this blog.  (And no, there won’t be any 4 a.m. Black Friday sales here either).  We’ll restart with the blog posts bright and early next week.

And finally and most importantly, thank you for all your support of this blog the last two months.  Happy Thanksgiving.