Engaging in the interactive process is an important — and sometimes overlooked — part of an employer’s response to a request for a reasonable accommodation under state and federal law.

I talked about this way back in 2008 (!) when the state Supreme Court released it’s landmark Curry v. Allen S. Goodman decision expanding the

Sometimes it’s hard to appreciate how things have changed since the pandemic hit and the challenges we face going forward.

I was thinking about all those little things over the weekend when I put pocket change in my little “change jar” that I keep in my bedroom.

You see, prior to the pandemic, at the

Last week, I had the opportunity to present to the Connecticut Association of Independent Schools, an accrediting agency serving over 90 schools and 30,000 students here in state.

The topic was one that doesn’t get enough attention at times and due to its applicability not to just to schools, but to all employers (public

If you look at the state Department of Labor website, you’ll find a notation about “proposed amended FMLA regulations” that have not yet been put into place. It adds “approval pending”.

As the modern saying goes: Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet.

In fact, last month – as I previewed in

When I got my first Macintosh computer in college, I was fascinated by little soundbites that you could add and play.

One of my favorites was a clip from the movie “2001” where Hal, the seemingly sentient space computer, says to an astronaut: “I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that” in response to

It’s back to school time so inevitably, the national press is reporting on a so-called trend of employers trying to coerce, cajole, encourage employees to come back to the office.

In some industries and locations, it is working. But in Connecticut, it’s more of a mixed bag.

Indeed, I commented about this in

Back in January 2020, I was one of the first legal bloggers to highlight the risks of a new coronavirus and asking the question: What if it spreads.  Over the next several weeks, I started to raise the alarm — so much so that my friend Kate called me out for being a “doomsday lawyer”. 

Back in May, I talked about “The New Digital Campaign for Your Company’s Workers” which challenged readers to gauge their familiarity with TikTok trends and which tried to highlight how unions are using newer social media platforms for their campaigns.

Recently, I had the opportunity to talk with the ProjectHR podcast about this very topic.