There’s been lots of good posts out there the last week and another round of stories that I haven’t gotten around to writing about for one reason or another. 

But that shouldn’t stop you from getting caught up on these notable stories on labor & employment law:

One of my new favorite "undiscovered gems" on the Internet, is Connecticut Judicial Branch Law Libraries’ Newslog.  It is a site maintained by the librarians with daily entries to help people stay informed about "recent legal developments, legal practice tools, and law library resources". It’s another example of how librarians are adapting to new technology and

When a new employee starts, there’s normally enough paperwork to fill a room.  One of those forms is the I-9 form issued by the UMorgue File - Public Domainnited States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), formerly INS.  What does the I-9 form check? It checks the new hire’s employment eligibility — in other words, is the person legally

Late today, a California judge granted a preliminary injunction barring the government from distributing letters to employers notifying them of social security number discrepancies.  These are known as "no-match" letters.  The order also prevents the government from enforcing a rule that would have required employers to terminate employees whose discrepancies weren’t resolved within 90 days.