In a followup to a post of earlier this week, Windsor Locks and its Superintendent of Schools reached an agreement late yesterday in which the Superintendent agreed to resign in exchange for a six month severance payment (to be shorted if he finds work before the expiration of that severance period.)

The agreement comes

For a few years now, I’ve been describing how social media policies are moving into the mainstream. 

No longer can employers simply cover their eyes and ears to what is going on with Facebook and Twitter.

Example No. 592: West Hartford, Connecticut is considering a policy that would place certain restrictions on what school employees say

Count me in the group that is both astonished and stunned by the corruption allegations made earlier today by the federal government against Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich.  The blatant nature of the "pay to play" allegations is something rarely seen in politics. (Connecticut has obviously has its share of corruption cases.)  While

You know it’s summer when the most exciting headline in employment law over the last day seems to be the markup of an arbitration fairness bill by a House Judiciary Subcommittee.  Not terribly exciting.  If you’d like more details on that bill, Workplace Horizons has a nice little summary and does it’s typical terrific job on keeping

UPDATE 8/3/10: In light of today’s workplace shootings in Manchester, I’ve provided some additional thoughts on workplace violence with reference back to the lottery headquarters shootings.

In small states like Connecticut, at times it feels like everyone is separated by something less than Six Degrees. 

Ten years ago today, a troubled worker