In a post last week, I pointed out that New York amended its laws to allow for some deductions by employers from an employee wages.  I joked that Connecticut could do the same as some of Connecticut’s rules are a bit dated themselves.  

A nice note from a Connecticut Department of Labor official suggested

Updated: August 28, 2011 – As of mid-morning, more than 40 percent of the state is without power, making this storm the highest power outage in state history.  Widespread office closures are expected for Monday and early this week.

It’s the (relatively) calm before the storm on Saturday night.  Hurricane Irene is definitely coming.

But

So, by now (Friday morning), your preparations at your workplace should be in full swing.  The latest forecasts this morning call for a landfall on Sunday somewhere along the Connecticut coast (perhaps Bridgeport) with hurricane impacts felt throughout the state.

Irene is Coming

Connecticut has set up some new resources since my post yesterday specifically on Hurricane Irene.  The 8 a.m. update is posted here.   It is frequently updated and also has a list of people to follow on Twitter.

But so far, it’s not easy to find out about all storm-related workplace laws in one place on the state’s website. (How about an update Department of Labor?)

While a blog post cannot address all of the FAQs that might come up, I thought it would be helpful to discuss a few wage/hour issues. As always, consult with your legal counsel/advisor on any specific issues you have and how these laws might apply to your workplace.

Reporting Time or Minimum Daily Earnings Guaranteed: Connecticut has a “reporting time” obligation (as do several of our neighboring states). It is contained in various regulations and applies to certain industries like the “mercantile trade”. You should already be aware of this law, but it has particular application in storm situations where people may not work full shifts.


Continue Reading Hurricane Irene: “Reporting Time” Pay and Other Wage & Hour Issues for Employers

Suppose your company has an incentive bonus plan that bases a bonus on the specific work done during a calendar year.  Bonus payments are made 90 days after the end of the calendar year on an “Award payment date.”

But your bonus plan has an important provision.  That provision states that “Participants must be employed

UPDATED 5.16.11

We’re just one week away from our seminar on employment law. It’s essentially sold out but we’re still taking names for a waiting list. Those signing up will get first priority when we re-run this program in the fall. 

We’re also less than two weeks away from the re-launch of the Connecticut

When does the workday begin? When does it end? 

These were among the questions that the Second Circuit addressed and resolved in an important wage & hour decision last week. The case, Kuebel v. Black & Decker, can be downloaded here.

The court held that an "employee’s commuting time is not compensable as part of

Back in June, the Connecticut Supreme Court issued its decision in Ziotas v. The Reardon Law Firm — a significant ruling because it found that where a bonus is discretionary and is not ascertainable by applying a formula, it did not constitute "wages". 

I talked about the case in a lengthy post and noted that