Alas, no Powerball for me.  So, it’s back to the law we go.

Over the last 24 hours, there has been a lot of other news in Connecticut about General Electric moving its headquarters to Massachusetts.  The reasons for the move are already in dispute, although to some, it’s because Connecticut is not as employer-friendly as other states.

I’ll leave it to the politicians to debate whether that is actually the case or not.

But from my employment law perspective, there are a few areas that politicians can look at if they are looking to change the perception of Connecticut not being receptive to businesses.

First: Connecticut ought to leave the non-compete law alone. This might sound surprising to some but Connecticut actually has an area of law that is fairly employer-friendly right now. Employers are free to impose (reasonable) restrictive covenants to allow employers to protect their business interests.  For a few years, the legislature has been pondering making a change.

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Photo of Daniel Schwartz Daniel Schwartz

Dan represents employers in various employment law matters such as employment discrimination, restrictive covenants, human resources, retaliation and whistle blowing, and wage and hour issues. He has extensive trial and litigation experience in both federal and state courts in a variety of areas…

Dan represents employers in various employment law matters such as employment discrimination, restrictive covenants, human resources, retaliation and whistle blowing, and wage and hour issues. He has extensive trial and litigation experience in both federal and state courts in a variety of areas, including commercial litigation and trade secret enforcement. Dan is the author of the independent Connecticut Employment Law Blog. The blog discusses new and noteworthy events in labor and employment law on a daily basis.