Back in 2019, I wrote this:

For employers, the time is ripe to think about a new strategy going forward. That strategy may focus on protection of confidential information and specific non-solicitation clauses. Regardless, the time of using non-compete agreements broadly may be coming to an end soon.

The recent announcement of the proposed

Earlier today, my colleague Sarah Niemiroski and I drafted the following alert which has been cross-posted at our firm’s website.

In a move with profound implications for workplaces, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) on Thursday, January 5, 2023, issued a sweeping proposal that would ban all non-compete agreements between employers and employees. While the timing

Twas the day before the night before Christmas
And all thru the law office
Not a creature was stirring
Except the employment lawyers reading the new Congressional Omnibus spending bill and looking for the employment law provisions tucked neatly inside.

In a parting gift for employers and employees, Congress passed a broad spending bill on

In some prior posts here and here, I talked about the development of artificial intelligence tools in the employment law context.

If you’ve been reading the headlines, the latest AI “tool” is a Chatbot titled “ChatGPT”.  You can read the latest The New York Times piece about it here.

In this context, it can

In my last post, I detailed all the changes that were occurring due to the new Clean Slate law that goes into effect January 1, 2023.  You might have missed hearing about the law because it passed in 2021 and the deadline seemed far away.

Well it’s here now.

So after you read the

In this year end rush, it would be easy to overlook the state’s new “Clean Slate” law. But employers in Connecticut should get ready now to implement the changes that occur on January 1, 2023.

So what is the Clean Slate law?

It dates back to 2021 and can be found here at Public Act

Don’t believe everything you read on the internet.

I suppose that’s the advice parents should be giving to their kids nowadays but it holds true in employment law too.

Take this sample severance agreement that shows up as number one on Google’s search for “severance agreements”.

It’s a terrible agreement.

Yes, it’s simple but it

The other day I came across the strange realization that I had not written about anti-Semitism in the 15 years that I’ve been writing this blog.

(I also came across the realization that automatic e-mail links to recent posts had also not been going out properly, if you’re wondering why you’re getting e-mails again now.)

As I’ve said in prior posts, the General Assembly isn’t exactly precise at times when writing legislation.  (One is reminded by the quote regarding sausage making.)

One issue that pops up from time to time is whether an employer need be “Connecticut-based” to be covered by Connecticut state laws, particularly as it applies to

Imagine, hypothetically, that you are the head of a massive technology company.  You decide one day that you want to layoff, say, 50 percent of the workforce tomorrow while offering employees a severance agreement. What should you know?

My colleagues, Gabe Jiran and Keegan Drenosky, did a whole webinar on the subject last month that