If you look at the state Department of Labor website, you’ll find a notation about “proposed amended FMLA regulations” that have not yet been put into place. It adds “approval pending”.

As the modern saying goes: Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet.

In fact, last month – as I previewed in

When I got my first Macintosh computer in college, I was fascinated by little soundbites that you could add and play.

One of my favorites was a clip from the movie “2001” where Hal, the seemingly sentient space computer, says to an astronaut: “I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that” in response to

It’s back to school time so inevitably, the national press is reporting on a so-called trend of employers trying to coerce, cajole, encourage employees to come back to the office.

In some industries and locations, it is working. But in Connecticut, it’s more of a mixed bag.

Indeed, I commented about this in

Back in January 2020, I was one of the first legal bloggers to highlight the risks of a new coronavirus and asking the question: What if it spreads.  Over the next several weeks, I started to raise the alarm — so much so that my friend Kate called me out for being a “doomsday lawyer”. 

Back in May, I talked about “The New Digital Campaign for Your Company’s Workers” which challenged readers to gauge their familiarity with TikTok trends and which tried to highlight how unions are using newer social media platforms for their campaigns.

Recently, I had the opportunity to talk with the ProjectHR podcast about this very topic. 

As the pandemic continues to rage on, the EEOC quietly updated its COVID guidance earlier this month rolling back some (but not all) of the discretion afforded to employers.

The biggest change has to do with testing as a condition of returning or remaining at work.  The new guidance puts some bumpers on employers’ use

A while back, my colleagues and I talked about new final proposed regulations implementing the revised CTFMLA law.

Turns out that “final” doesn’t actually mean FINAL.

On June 28, 2022, the Legislation Regulation Review Committee (LRCC) rejected the so-called “final” regulation without prejudice and asked that a number of corrections be made to the regulations.

One of the things I love to do is play golf. It’s mentally challenging, (somewhat) physically demanding, and you always strive for perfection.

That said, one of the things that I’m not very good at is golf itself.  Sure, I’m better than some but as someone once joked to me:  You can be good golfer