This post is for the employment law nerds out there.

You know who you are.

You pore over the statistics that show a correlation between the unemployment rate and EEOC filings.  (I see you Lawffice Space.)

You rate who the “Worst Employer” is of 2017.  (Can’t wait for the announcement next week, Ohio Employer’s Law Blog.)

You listen to podcasts about employment law. (Yes you, Hostile Work Environment podcast from Marc Alifanz.)

And, if you’re the publisher of this blog, you pore over meeting minutes of the Connecticut Commission of Human Rights and Opportunities.

Someone has to do it.

And in reading the minutes of an August 2017, I saw a references to a new Case Assessment Review process in place since July 1, 2017.

“What was this?”, I thought at the time.  I got excited.

And then in October 2017, in a moment of brilliance extreme employment law nerd-ism, I sent an old-fashioned Freedom of Information request for that procedure.

Then I waited.  And waited.  At least it seemed like I waited.

Actually, it wasn’t long at all. Just a few days, in fact. My thanks to the agency for complying with state law humoring me and responding so promptly.

It arrived in my inbox. All 18 pages worth.

I wish I could tell you that it was groundbreaking.

It wasn’t.  A lot of the details in it are so pedestrian (“Clerical creates a case folder in the S drive”) that it’s only surprising in the level of detail.

There are a few nuggets of data.  It confirms that the Case Assessments are being handled by “Legal” now in a centralized location.

In fact, the cases are assigned to different people for drafts based on the last digit of the case number.  (Rejected slogans: “C’mon Lucky #7!” or “Stay Alive with #5!”)  The Principal Attorney will then review the proposed drafts.

And…I’ve probably lost you already.

See? It really only something for the employment law geeks.

If you are such a person, you can read the document here.  Consider it your Hanukkah present.

You’re welcome.

 

  • Jeffry Spahr

    My name is Jeff. I am an Employment Law Nerd……………………

    ps the link to see the document brings you back to the original page

  • Rebecca

    Great post, Dan. Is your reading of this that the Principal Attorney has no involvement in CAR unless a dismissal is recommended (i.e. that there is no “check” on a decision to retain)? Also, given that the dismissals are based on the last digit of the charge number, it seems companion cases could be decided differently, with one kept and one retained, even if the same legal principles would apply to the decision. Any thoughts or experience related to this?