Last week, Law360 quoted me in an article on marital status discrimination. (They timed it for Valentine’s Day; make of that what you will.)

The gist of the article is that marital status discrimination is something for employers to be mindful of.

And for that premise, I’m in agreement. Several states, including Connecticut, explicitly

A significant change has gone into effect New York City effective on November 22, 2023 with an amendment to the city’s Human Rights law.

The key focus of this amendment is the prohibition of discrimination based on an individual’s height and weight in employment, housing, and public accommodations.

The law prohibits NYC employers — that

Back in 2021, a change to the state’s unemployment compensation law might have been overlooked. After all, the provisions didn’t go into effect until January 1, 2024.

Alas, the time is now for employers to pay attention.

The state Department of Labor has a whole list of all the changes going into effect but I

As I continue my examination of some of the programs arising from the ABA Labor & Employment Conference held earlier this month in Seattle, one of the more notable topics was addressing wage & hour laws with employees now working across the country.

The great reshuffle has had a significant impact in the workplace since

I recently was able to attend the American Bar Association Labor & Employment Law Section Annual Conference — this time in Seattle. It’s a conference I’ve posted about many times before.

There were several good programs that were held which I hope to write about in upcoming posts. One of them covered the topic of

Effective November 1, 2023, a new version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification form, is now the proper version to use — which comes with several significant changes. Here are some of the highlights:

Changes to Procedures

Overall, the new Form I-9 is a shorter and easier way for employers to verify their employees’

Back in June, when the state minimum wage increased to $15 an hour, I warned that because the minimum wage was now tied to the employment cost index for wages and salaries for all civilian workers — as defined by the United States Department of Labor — it was likely to go up effective January