Connecticut Employment Law Blog Insight on Labor & Employment Developments for Connecticut Businesses

The Underside of Vine: Another Headache for Employers

Posted in Human Resources (HR) Compliance, Social Media

As I highlighted last month, Vine – a new video-sharing app — is quickly infiltrating the workplace.  Since my original post, I’ve been keeping tabs on what people are doing on it.

And it isn’t pretty.  Videos seem to be increasing with people using hashtags like “#work” or “#worksucks” daily.  They are also using hashtags like “#fml”; if you’re not familiar with the shorthand, the Urban Dictionary has the details.  Hint: It doesn’t mean Fix My Lighthouse anymore.

The Wall Street Journal Law Blog wrote about it in a post today (welcome WSJ readers!). 

But I remain amazed at the lack of discretion some employees have. Take this employee who smokes weed IN HIS COMPANY UNIFORM (Vine app required).  Insert your “hashtag” joke here.  (Actually, search for “#tokedaily” or “#wakeandbake” on Vine – you’ll be shocked.)

Or this employee who posts from a popular fast-food restaurant using the hashtags “#hatework” and “#bored”.

Or this employee who seems to work at a popular clothing store and used the hashtag “#hatework”…along with the name of her employer. 

A firewall isn’t going to stop employees from doing this anymore. Instead, some policies and guidelines, and some training is your first line of defense.  

Those who are also quick to attack Vine (much like people derided Facebook) are shooting the messenger. Employees will use whatever seems easy to them; Vine is just the latest example.  It’s up to employers to provide the guidance to employees about what is appropriate. 

Until then, Vine will remain the newest front-line in the ever-increasing use of smartphones in the workplace.

  • http://www.employmentattorneyservices.com/ Wayne Morrise

    This app seems to be a slap to every employer. Although this can be a good tool to know what we are lacking as an employer to our employees. Let us all be straight-forward to each other. Respecting our employees and returning back the respect to your employers should be mandatory. Well, we have the freedom to speak. However, it seems not good to back stab our employer.