In a decision to be officially released tomorrow, the Connecticut Appellate Court has affirmed a dismissal of a breach of contract claim that alleged that the company failed to follow procedures that were outlined in a management training seminar. 

The case, Brule v. Nerac (download here), is important because it sets some limits to

There is an unspoken truth about the Superior Courts in Connecticut: Summary judgment for employers in employment-related claims is typically a long shot. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule.

A case to be released by the Connecticut Appellate Court next week shows the difficulty but also shows that at least with regard to

From time to time, employers are faced with a quandary: When an employee has not been following the rules, do I fire the employee straight up? Or do I give the employee an opportunity to resign first, and potentially sign a settlement agreement?

Why might an employer do that? Well, it allows the employee to save face

As I’ve noted before, the appellate courts in Connecticut release their decisions in advance of an "official" publication date for various reasons. I’ve now read over the Appellate Court’s upcoming decision in Paylan v. St. Mary’s Hospital Corp. a few times  trying to discern the big lesson for employers to take from this employment

Just when you think you’ve seen it all, another case comes around to prove that theory incorrect.

The latest example is Ayantola v. Board of Trustees of Technical Colleges (download here), a Connecticut Appellate Court decision officially released today. In the case, an employee who claimed he was not promoted in retaliation for earlier

Appellate Court decisions can be frustrating.  Every once in a while, instead of deciding the merits of the matter, the court will reject an appeal because a party did not "preserve" the issue at the lower courts through a proper protest. 

That’s what happened in Mokonnen v. Pro Park, Inc. (download here)  from the