As I’ve mentioned before, our firm has been producing a series of free webinars covering various employment law topics our clients have asked us to talk about. You can watch any of our recorded webinars and find more information about our upcoming presentations here.

I recently presented with my colleagues Sarah Niemiroski and Sheridan King

For months, employers have been eagerly awaiting updated regulations that address the revisions to the Connecticut Family and Medical Leave Act.

At last, on March 22, 2022, the Connecticut Department of Labor (“CT DOL”) released its final proposed amended CTFMLA regulations, answering questions that had remained unanswered by the revised law.

Indeed, the proposed regulations

Over the last two weeks or so, several federal courts have issued nationwide injunctions prohibiting the U.S. government from going forward with mandatory vaccination (or vax and test) rules that have been implemented.

First, it was the Fifth Circuit that stayed the OSHA “Vax or Test” ETS. That case and others around the country have

In a decision that will be officially released on Tuesday, the Connecticut Appellate Court has upheld the dismissal of a wrongful discharge claim against Marvelwood School, an independent school in Kent, Connecticut. In doing so, the Court turned back an attempt to limit the employment-at-will doctrine and provided employers in Connecticut with reassurance that wrongful discharge claims will be appropriately limited.

The case, Zweig v. Marvelwood School, can be viewed here.

(An upfront disclosure: My firm represented the employer here and I represented the school on the successful appeal.) 

The facts of the case are relatively straightforward and are summarized in the court’s decision. The plaintiff Aaron Zweig was employed by the defendant Marvelwood School as a history teacher and school’s Director of Food Studies. That role required him to establish and maintain a garden on campus and use it to teach a class on food studies.

In May, 2015, Mr. Zweig allegedly objected to the school’s suggestion that telephone poles that had been treated with creosote, a pesticide and wood preservative, be used to make raised beds in the garden because he believed that the chemical posed a health risk to himself and his students.

Continue Reading Connecticut Appellate Court Rejects Challenge to At-Will Employment Doctrine

You may recall that back in December 2019 (doesn’t that seem like so long ago?), the General Assembly and Governor Lamont fashioned a compromise on so-called “dual duties” legislation.

The bill required the Department of Labor to revisit a 1950 regulation that has been interpreted by some as requiring time that a server spends

Way back in April, the state first instituted a mandatory mask and face covering rule under Executive Order 7BB. 

On Friday, the state updated it in Executive Order 7NNN by requiring medical documentation in order to be exempt. Here’s all that you need to know on the changes.

The new rule states: “Effective immediately, any

Words normally come easy on this blog.

Today I should be writing a simple post about a new Executive Order that will make it easier for people to file for unemployment claims if they believe their workplace is unsafe.

But I can’t.  Not right now. There’s too much pain in the United States today.  And

Typically, in our court system, we operate under the “American Rule” which means that parties have to pay their own attorneys’ fees in cases, regardless of whether they win or lose.  (Contrast that with the English Rule which is a “loser pays” system.)

But there is one big exception to the American Rule — and