Discrimination & Harassment

The U.S. Supreme Court today ruled that the “ministerial exception” that bars some employment discrimination claims against religious institutions, also bars such claims by elementary school teachers at private Catholic schools.  The case further clarifies an exception that came to prominence back in 2012 and expands the reach of the exception.   I noted then

We made it halfway through 2020.

I know it FEELS as if it should be December, but just think how long March was!

A lot has changed since the start of the pandemic.  But over the last few weeks, I’ve been hearing from employers wondering where things stand right now. What’s changed? What still

In the most consequential U.S. Supreme Court case in many years, the Court ruled this morning that Title VII prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

You can download the 6-3 decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, here.

Connecticut has long prohibited employment discrimination on the basis of sexual

One of the items I talk about in a sexual harassment prevention training is that people’s perception of what sexual harassment is, may differ from how a court defines it.

Suppose I told you that the owner of a small company that you worked at and reported to made inappropriate comments in discussing the size

Last week, I had the opportunity to listen in on an informative CLE program sponsored by the Practicing Law Institute on video mediation. I’ve already participated in several of these mediations and have started incorporating them into the mediations that I do for other attorneys.

The term “video mediation” is still a work in progress.

The last time that I spoke with Plaintiff’s attorney Nina Pirrotti, the pandemic was just beginning and we were just getting used to our home offices. Now, 10 weeks later, the abnormal has become normal.  My business attire has gotten a bit more casual and my office a bit more organized.

But it seemed a

Words normally come easy on this blog.

Today I should be writing a simple post about a new Executive Order that will make it easier for people to file for unemployment claims if they believe their workplace is unsafe.

But I can’t.  Not right now. There’s too much pain in the United States today.  And

You read the Sector Rules for reopening offices in Connecticut.

If you read page 5, you’d come across one of the guiding principles for reopening:

As we start opening select businesses…we will open at our strictest controls.  This will include…Those in high-risk groups (comorbidities) and over the age of 65 should continue to stay

Lately, I’ve been talking with more employers about permanent reductions in force.

It’s not fun.

And it’s not something I thought we’d be talking about 3 months ago, and yet it’s not foreign to me either.

In fact, I spent several of my earliest posts here on this exact topic. 

As I talk with employers