Yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak to the IASA Northeastern Conference on a favorite topic of mine of late — Privacy and Data Breaches in the workplace.

Of course, that sounds kinda of boring.

So my presentation is actually called the title of this post: “The Rise of Smartphone Fueled, Social Media Addicted Workplace Zombies.”

Much catchier right?

Speaking before the Insurance Accounting & Systems Association (IASA) Northeastern Chapter at their 54th Annual Regional Conference was great fun though.

In my talk, I highlighted items like Business E-mail Compromise scams, Ransomware, and yes, even workplace zombies.

What do I mean by that? Well, too many of us (including me at times) stare at our phones and sometimes respond to e-mails or click without thinking.  (Think Before You Click would make the name of a good book; fortunately, I wrote a chapter in that very book a while back.)

Protecting workplace data IS about thinking. It’s about protecting personnel files, or benefit information, or retirement plan data.  It’s about protecting trade secrets or just plain confidential information.

It’s about building a CULTURE of data privacy. Where employees buy in that protecting data is a core value and where employees are REWARDED for good data practices while enforcement (with a bit of punishment where needed) is encouraged by all.

It’s not the most exciting topic to be sure but everyone wants to be protected from the zombies, right?

I gave a similar talk early this summer as keynote lunch speaker for the ADNET Worksmart conference and it worked so well, word got around.  Maybe data privacy can be interesting after all.

My thanks to IASA for the invitation and opportunity to speak to the group yesterday.

shrmprogramI’m pleased to announce an upcoming program that my firm, Shipman & Goodwin and the Connecticut State Council of SHRM are producing next month and that I’ve been planning for several months.

The program, entitled “Data Privacy & Human Resources” will be a unique endeavor for us.  First, we are planning on doing it in both our Hartford & Stamford offices at the same time.  Speakers will be in both locations (though obviously not the SAME speakers, for those grammar buffs).

On top of that, we will be broadcasting it live via a webinar.

What could go wrong?

Hopefully, nothing, because really, it should be very informative.  It’s scheduled for the morning of December 11, 2015.

The first hour will focus on the key things employers need to know about the revisions to the state’s new data privacy law. The second hour will talk about the very latest in human resources including the current status of the proposed overtime regulations and the state’s new social media privacy law.

It’s going to be fast-paced and informative. But space is definitely limited and within the first 48 hours of our e-mail alert, we’re already halfway to our in-person room capacity.

If you’re interested in attending, check out this link and register online. The cost is just $35, but this includes breakfast and the materials. (If you’re watching via webinar, breakfast is on your own — naturally.)

And if you’d like to see the flyer, you can download it here.

Last month, I wrote about the Home Depot credit card data breach and the importance of protecting company data.  But the issue of protecting employee data is far from new.

Back in 2011, one legal publication had this to say about employee data:

Employers collect a substantial amount of personal information about their employees. Companies need to be aware of their obligations under the profusion of data protection laws and regulations that govern the collection, use and transfer of personal information. This is an especially daunting task for companies that have operations subject to the laws of multiple jurisdictions, as requirements vary widely from country to country and even from state to state. …

Companies use employees’ personal information for a variety of purposes—from evaluating applicants during the hiring process to administering payroll and employee benefit plans to managing separation and other post-employment benefits. And as more employers adopt enterprise-level information management systems and outsource certain human resources administration functions, increasing amounts of personal data is being transferred and shared within and between organizations. Maintaining compliance with applicable data privacy laws is a responsibility employers cannot afford to overlook.

I couldn’t say it better myself.  But don’t take my word for it. There are a whole host of experts coming to speak later this month at a Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Summit that I’ve been planning.  People from companies like ESPN, UTC and GE. And respected government officials from the Connecticut Attorney General’s office and the FBI.

The summit is co-sponsored by my law firm, Shipman & Goodwin LLP and the Connecticut chapter of SHRM.  It is scheduled for October 16th at the Crowne Plaza in Cromwell, CT. You can register for it here. Don’t miss out.

Real hackers are more fearsome than this one.

Okay, okay.  I realize the headline is a bit misleading.  But it isn’t every day that you hear about a data breach at Home Depot in which 56 MILLION credit cards may have been hacked. To put that into perspective, that’s 16 million MORE than the infamous Target breach!

But this is an employment law blog, not a shopping one. So, why does this matter to human resources professionals and companies? Because if hackers can access credit card information, they are going to try to hack into your work files.

It isn’t a matter of “if”. It’s a matter of when they will attempt to do so.

Don’t take my word for it. This comes from the head of the military’s cybersecurity division.  Admiral Mike Rogers has been preaching for months of the need for companies to take data privacy and cybersecurity seriously.  A recent news post reported on the importance Rogers has placed on this area for private businesses.

Corporations must successfully deal with cybersecurity threats, because such threats can have direct impacts on business and reputation, Rogers told the business audience.“You have to consider [cybersecurity threats] every bit as foundational as we do in our ability to maneuver forces as a military construct,” he said.

I have little doubt you’ll hear a lot more about this at an upcoming Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Summit that I’ve been helping to put together here at Shipman & Goodwin, in conduction with CT SHRM.

It’s scheduled to be held on October 16, 2014 from 8a to 2p at the Crowne Plaza in Cromwell, CT.

The cost is just $75, which includes continental breakfast, coffee, buffet lunch, and the materials.  Full details as well as registration can be found here.

Speakers include myself, Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Scott Cowperthwait, Cathy Intravia and William Roberts as well as industry experts from Adnet Technologies, the Connecticut Attorney General’s office, ESPN, the FBI, FINEX North America, General Electric Company, JPD Forensic Accounting, Quinnipiac University, United Therapeutics Corporation, and United Technologies Corporation (UTC).

Hope to see you there. Register soon as spots have been filling up over the last week.

First off, I should let you know that I am a poor substitute for Harrison Ford.

But, don’t let that dissuade you from saving October 16th as the date for a terrific conference that I’m helping to plan.  The title is “Raiders of the Data Ark” and the subject is “2014 Data Privacy & Cyber Security Summit: Practical Tips and Legal Risks for Connecticut Companies”.

It will be held at the Crowne Plaza in Cromwell from 8a-2p and will include breakfast, lunch, and several hours of notable speakers.

The conference, which is being run by both Shipman & Goodwin (my firm) and the Connecticut chapter of SHRM, is designed for operations personnel, in-house counsel, human resources personnel, general managers, finance managers and anyone else interested in solution-oriented approaches to the topic.

Registration will be up soon, so for now, just save the date and watch this space for more information!