Employment discrimination claims are often decided on the merits of the claim. Courts routinely have to answer the question: Did the employer discriminate on the basis of a protected class against an employee in terminating the employment of that individual?

But there’s another class of cases that can resolved on procedural grounds, often times in

Don’t believe the hype — Valentine’s Day may be for lovers, but for employers, it’s only trouble. Indeed, back in 2011, I highlighted the perils of Valentine’s Day for employers recapping various cases in which Valentine’s Day played a central role. Given the day, I thought I would reprint it today as a reminder —

A significant change has gone into effect New York City effective on November 22, 2023 with an amendment to the city’s Human Rights law.

The key focus of this amendment is the prohibition of discrimination based on an individual’s height and weight in employment, housing, and public accommodations.

The law prohibits NYC employers — that

With Thanksgiving now well behind us and COVID something that feels more manageable than in past years (notice my use of “feels”), some companies are planning for their first holiday party in four years.

Of course, I’ve written about holiday parties before and much hasn’t changed. The biggest change from 2019 is that cannabis is

Back in 2021, a change to the state’s unemployment compensation law might have been overlooked. After all, the provisions didn’t go into effect until January 1, 2024.

Alas, the time is now for employers to pay attention.

The state Department of Labor has a whole list of all the changes going into effect but I

As I continue my examination of some of the programs arising from the ABA Labor & Employment Conference held earlier this month in Seattle, one of the more notable topics was addressing wage & hour laws with employees now working across the country.

The great reshuffle has had a significant impact in the workplace since

The latest episode of “From Lawyer to Employer”, a Shipman podcast that I’m hosting this season, is now live and it’s all about accommodations and leaves in the workplace.

What we try to tackle, however, are the more challenging or unusual accommodation requests that employers sometimes get. Accommodating someone who is restricted in their

Continuing my series of posts arising from the ABA Labor & Employment Conference earlier this month, one of the most interesting programs I attended was a plenary session on neurodiversity in the workplace.

“Neurodiversity describes the idea that people experience and interact with the world around them in many different ways; there is no one

I recently was able to attend the American Bar Association Labor & Employment Law Section Annual Conference — this time in Seattle. It’s a conference I’ve posted about many times before.

There were several good programs that were held which I hope to write about in upcoming posts. One of them covered the topic of

Effective November 1, 2023, a new version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification form, is now the proper version to use — which comes with several significant changes. Here are some of the highlights:

Changes to Procedures

Overall, the new Form I-9 is a shorter and easier way for employers to verify their employees’