What Would Clooney Think?
What Would Clooney Think?

Your employee that you are firing should not hear about his firing from a television report first.

I suppose that would seem an obvious rule to follow. But apparently not.

Let me back up.

Earlier today, the President fired FBI Director James Comey — an act that really is more for politics blogs, than an employment law blog.

But as the details of the firing trickled out in the evening, one detail jumped out at me — James Comey found out he was fired through the television.

From The New York Times:

Mr. Comey was addressing a group of F.B.I. employees in Los Angeles when a television in the background flashed the news that he had been fired.

In response, Mr. Comey laughed, saying he thought it was a fairly funny prank.

Then his staff started scurrying around in the background and told Mr. Comey that he should step into a nearby office.

Now, I’m sure there are many who don’t feel sorry for Mr. Comey; but still, where’s the humanity in firing someone via television?

Of course, this kind of schtick isn’t reserved just for politics. I remember back in 2009, I gave the following tip as well: Do not do layoffs or firings via e-mail. Period. (And last year, I wrote about how to conduct firings without getting sued too.)

So, for employers that are having to conduct firings, let me offer five suggestions for the actual informing of employees that they are being fired.

  1. Do it in person if possible, and have a witness.  If it’s not possible (distance, other circumstances), a phone call is a backup option.
  2. Do it in private.  Pick a time perhaps near the end of the day (or beginning) and perhaps in a location in the office that is away from crowds.
  3. Be brief and direct.  And plan in advance, what you are going to say.  Don’t draw it out, and don’t use wishy-washy language.  Some employers start with the “I have some bad news for you today.”
  4. Don’t argue with the employee or get into lengthy discussions regarding the termination. Be clear that the decision is final.
  5. Be sensitive.  Yes, firing an employee is typically hard on the employer, but guess what? It’s harder on the employee. Always.  Acknowledge the employee may disagree with the decision but be consistent with your message.

There is obviously a lot more to a termination meeting than this. Successful meetings are the result of preparation and practice.

But just remember: Your employee should find out he is being fired first from you — not a third party.

Real hackers are more fearsome than this one.

Okay, okay.  I realize the headline is a bit misleading.  But it isn’t every day that you hear about a data breach at Home Depot in which 56 MILLION credit cards may have been hacked. To put that into perspective, that’s 16 million MORE than the infamous Target breach!

But this is an employment law blog, not a shopping one. So, why does this matter to human resources professionals and companies? Because if hackers can access credit card information, they are going to try to hack into your work files.

It isn’t a matter of “if”. It’s a matter of when they will attempt to do so.

Don’t take my word for it. This comes from the head of the military’s cybersecurity division.  Admiral Mike Rogers has been preaching for months of the need for companies to take data privacy and cybersecurity seriously.  A recent news post reported on the importance Rogers has placed on this area for private businesses.

Corporations must successfully deal with cybersecurity threats, because such threats can have direct impacts on business and reputation, Rogers told the business audience.“You have to consider [cybersecurity threats] every bit as foundational as we do in our ability to maneuver forces as a military construct,” he said.

I have little doubt you’ll hear a lot more about this at an upcoming Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Summit that I’ve been helping to put together here at Shipman & Goodwin, in conduction with CT SHRM.

It’s scheduled to be held on October 16, 2014 from 8a to 2p at the Crowne Plaza in Cromwell, CT.

The cost is just $75, which includes continental breakfast, coffee, buffet lunch, and the materials.  Full details as well as registration can be found here.

Speakers include myself, Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Scott Cowperthwait, Cathy Intravia and William Roberts as well as industry experts from Adnet Technologies, the Connecticut Attorney General’s office, ESPN, the FBI, FINEX North America, General Electric Company, JPD Forensic Accounting, Quinnipiac University, United Therapeutics Corporation, and United Technologies Corporation (UTC).

Hope to see you there. Register soon as spots have been filling up over the last week.