From time to time, I take a look back at a prior post that may have particular relevance now. With Halloween knocking on our doorstep and sexual harassment claims on the rise, this post from 2010 has just as much meaning today.

For most people, Halloween is a fun and silly holiday.

Yet the holiday has a distinct place in employment law history.  Indeed, for some employers, the holiday has brought more tricks than treats.

  • In Marrero v. Goya of Puerto Rico, 304 F.3d 7 (1st Cir. 2002), a supervisor was alleged to have gone out to buy Halloween presents. Allegedly, he gave the employee “a direct penetrating look with lust,” and said: “I have a little present for you that you’re never going to forget and if you don’t do the things I tell you and order you to do I am going to fire you.”
  • In Grubka v. Department of Treasury, 858 F.2d 1570 (Fed. Cir. 1988), a supervisor appealed his demotion for engaging in alleged acts of misconduct in kissing and embracing two female employees at a Halloween party organized and staged by the employees at a hotel after hours away from their workplace and for their entertainment.  While he prevailed, i’m not quite sure its the type of activity one would put on a resume.
  • In Lester v. Natsios, 290 F. Supp. 2d 11 (D. D.C. 2003), an employee claimed racial harassment after a costume incident that is probably best left to the court’s analysis: “The …incident is best described as silly, although perhaps also somewhat offensive. It involved a supervisor who dressed up for a Halloween party in a costume as a plant, and then snipped scissors at plaintiff in a conference room.” Um, ok.
  • In Richardson v. New York State Dept. of Corr. Ser., 180 F. 3d 426(2d Cir. 1999), an employee claimed that at Halloween, a co-worker said to the plaintiff something to the effect that “all you spooks have a nice Halloween.” According to the court, the Plaintiff “perceived that the word “spooks” was used as a derogatory term for Black people, and recalled that her co-workers all turned to look at her when the remark was made.” The Court ultimately allowed some hostile work environment claims to proceed, though other references to “lynchings” probably had something to do with it too.
  • Then of course, there’s the supervisor who was alleged to have had a frank discussion of what he was going to wear for Halloween. In Caouette v. OfficeMax, Inc., 352 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. N.H. 2005), a female cashier, alleged that the supervisor “responded to a question about his stated intention to dress as a woman for Halloween by saying that he was a hermaphrodite who menstruated and used to wear a bra.”  The court upheld his termination.

So, as your employees dress up and act silly, keep on the lookout for employees who cross the line.

As these cases show, Halloween is no excuse for harassment.

“Let’s engage in a Halloween-type party where everybody would be having sex.”

Or perhaps, “So, are you going to wear a bikini for your Halloween costume?”

What is it about Halloween that brings out the creep factor in the workplace?

The first quote is from a real district court case earlier this year which documented a series of alleged comments made relating to a sexual harassment complaint.

(If you’re scratching your head at the reference to a “Halloween-type” party, I’m right there with you.)

The second is from a different case that is no less offensive in its descriptions of pervasive inappropriate conduct in the workplace.

(And, as if you needed confirmation, Princess Leia in a bikini from Return of the Jedi is not appropriate in the workplace, however cool Princess Leia is.)

Now, long time readers may recall a 2008 post about the perils of costumes in the workplace, and another post in 2010 about the perils of enabling sexual harassment when it comes to Halloween.

And yet, it continues.

Suzanne Lucas (a/k/a Evil Hr Lady) recently posted some tips about hosting an Office Halloween party.  Among them:

Costumes shouldn’t make fun of other cultures, the word “sexy” shouldn’t be attached to any workplace costume and the gore should be kept to a minimum. Remember, the goal is to have fun, not to offend. If you want to dress up as a sexy zombie, save that for your own Halloween party with personal friends.

But here’s my simple advice, be afraid. Be very very afraid. There are just way too many bad things that happen on Halloween with far more “tricks” than “treats”.

I realize that sounds like a no-fun lawyer, but how many more sexual harassment cases from Halloween do we really want or need? Do I need to keep writing these posts each Halloween?

Scary stuff.

It’s that time of year again. When employees dress up in inappropriate outfits and engage in general stupidity.

I am speaking, of course, about Halloween.

Don’t believe me? I’ve got several blog posts to prove it.

For example, in prior years, I’ve warned you to be on the lookout for “Naughty Nurses”.  Yes, somewhere out there some employee is thinking this is a good idea.

But costumes aren’t the only source of trouble.  Buying an employee Halloween presents with a “lustful” look in your eyes, led to another lawsuit.

Then there was the supervisor was fired after he “responded to a question about his stated intention to dress as a woman for Halloween by saying that he was a hermaphrodite who menstruated and used to wear a bra.”  You’ll have to read that one for yourself.

In any event, Halloween doesn’t have to be the source of trouble.  Even though one judge told one litigant that Halloween was going to be a “pain in the neck”.

Trick or treat?

The last two years, it hasn’t been much fun to celebrate Halloween in Connecticut. Between the freak Snowtober storm and then Superstorm Sandy, it’s nice to have a relatively quiet year.

But for employers, this whole “back to normal” thing could lead to unintended consequences.

So, on this Halloween, it’s worth revisiting two older posts that look at the dark side of Halloween.

Back in 2008, I looked at costumes in the workplace.  While overall, costumes can be harmless, they can lead to unintentional consequences — particularly when that one employee is dressed as a “Naughty Nurse”. 

And then in 2010, I recounted case after case where events on Halloween served as the basis for a discrimination or harassment lawsuit. 

Of course, this topic continues to make headlines as one follower noted on Twitter.  Want to know the “Pros and Cons” of dressing up today? Take a look here.

So, I wish you more treats than tricks today. And for human resources personnel everywhere, I wish you good luck getting through today.

For most people, Halloween is a fun and silly holiday.

Yet the holiday has a distinct place in employment law history.  Indeed, for some employers, the holiday has brought more tricks than treats. 

  • In Marrero v. Goya of Puerto Rico, 304 F.3d 7 (1st Cir. 2002), a supervisor was alleged to have gone out to buy Halloween presents. Allegedly, he gave the employee "a direct penetrating look with lust," and said: "I have a little present for you that you’re never going to forget and if you don’t do the things I tell you and order you to do I am going to fire you." 
     
  • In Grubka v. Department of Treasury, 858 F.2d 1570 (Fed. Cir. 1988), a supervisor appealed his demotion for engaging in alleged acts of misconduct in kissing and embracing two female employees at a Halloween party organized and staged by the employees at a hotel after hours away from their workplace and for their entertainment.  While he prevailed, i’m not quite sure its the type of activity one would put on a resume.
  • In Lester v. Natsios, 290 F. Supp. 2d 11 (D. D.C. 2003), an employee claimed racial harassment after a costume incident that is probably best left to the court’s analysis: "The …incident is best described as silly, although perhaps also somewhat offensive. It involved a supervisor who dressed up for a Halloween party in a costume as a plant, and then snipped scissors at plaintiff in a conference room." Um, ok.

  • In Richardson v. New York State Dept. of Corr. Ser., 180 F. 3d 426(2d Cir. 1999), an employee claimed that at Halloween, a co-worker said to the plaintiff something to the effect that "all you spooks have a nice Halloween." According to the court, the Plaintiff "perceived that the word "spooks" was used as a derogatory term for Black people, and recalled that her co-workers all turned to look at her when the remark was made." The Court ultimately allowed some hostile work environment claims to proceed, though other references to "lynchings" probably had something to do with it too. 

  • Then of course, there’s the supervisor who was alleged to have had a frank discussion of what he was going to wear for Halloween. In Caouette v. OfficeMax, Inc., 352 F. Supp. 2d 134 (D. N.H. 2005), a female cashier, alleged that the supervisor "responded to a question about his stated intention to dress as a woman for Halloween by saying that he was a hermaphrodite who menstruated and used to wear a bra."  The court upheld his termination.

So, as your employees dress up and act silly, keep on the lookout for employees who cross the line.  As these cases show, Halloween is no excuse for harassment. 

For a further reminder, you can read my prior Halloween post about "Naughty Nurses".