In various posts, I’ve talked about how there is a slow but increasing trend to encourage employers to “ban the box” when it comes to job applications. That catchy (yet non-descriptive phrase) refers to a checkbox that is often found on job applications that asks applicants if they have any criminal convictions.

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In helping employers on wage and hour issues, I’m struck sometimes by the occasional failure to maintain proper records on their employees.

For employers, payroll companies now offer to help an employer with such records and can often provide some of the information once the employer shares it with them.

The Connecticut Department of Labor lists eight types of wage & hour records that all employers, regardless of size must keep. They are:

  • The employee’s name and address.
  • The employee’s occupation.
  • The total daily and total weekly hours worked, showing the beginning and ending time of each work period, computed to the nearest unit of 15 minutes.
  • The total hourly, daily or weekly basic wage.
  • The overtime wage as a separate item from the basic wage.
  • Additions to, or deductions from, wages each pay period.
  • Total wages paid each pay period.
  • Working papers/statements of age for each employee under the age of 18.

The employer must maintain these records on their premises, though I haven’t heard of the Department coming down on an employer when such records are maintained electronically in the “cloud” — which is technically off-site.

But employers should consider going beyond the minimum.  If the Department of Labor does decide to do an investigation, it is likely that they will seek the following eight types of documents, at a minimum:
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With all the talk this week about Title VII and what I would call slightly more "advanced" issues in employment law, it’s always wise to make sure that you, as acourtesy morgue filen employer, have the basics down. 

One issue, for example, that employers sometimes wonder about but rarely figure out is "What Records Must I Keep

Record numbers of discrimination complaints were filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, according to a MSNBC column:

Discrimination claims filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission jumped 15 percent in fiscal 2008 to 95,402 — the highest level since the agency opened in 1965, said spokesman David Grinberg. That is up from 82,792 claims