It’s supposed to snow Friday here in Connecticut.

In October.

For those of us with memories, we all remember the last time we got substantial snowfall in October in 2011. It ended with lots of power outages and many downed trees. So let’s first hope the snow is just more nuisance than anything else.

Far

Election Day is nearly upon us.

But unlike prior years, many Connecticut residents have already voted, thanks to the pandemic-related absentee ballot system uage.

Still, next Tuesday, our fellow citizens will still take to the polls from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. to vote for their favorite candidate.  You can find out where you should

Can you “Say Anything” in the workplace?

Last month, a Silicon Valley CEO told employees that its mission doesn’t include taking stands on political issues outside the financial realm.

As a result, and as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle, “employees were told that internal debates about politics and activism not related to

Among the employment law questions that most people ask, I can tell you that “Are strippers independent contractors or employees?” isn’t one of them.

And yet, having posed the question, isn’t there something about it that demands an answer? After all, the employment laws we have should apply to everyone, right?

Indeed, as I’ve recounted

Before the pandemic (remember then?), you may recall a case last year that drew headlines: Chip’s Family Restaurants was having issues with a class action lawsuit filed against the small chain by allegedly improperly deducting a tip credit from server earnings thereby paying those potential class members below the minimum wage for the performance of

Every four years I have a dream that an employment law question will be asked at a Presidential Debate.

I have yet to have that dream realized. And if the topics of debate moderator Chris Wallace are to be believed, we will have to wait (still further) for such questions at an upcoming debate.

You may recall that back in December 2019 (doesn’t that seem like so long ago?), the General Assembly and Governor Lamont fashioned a compromise on so-called “dual duties” legislation.

The bill required the Department of Labor to revisit a 1950 regulation that has been interpreted by some as requiring time that a server spends

13 years ago this week, I started this blog. But rather than dwell on another anniversary (and six months since working from home), I’d rather spend the time hitting a few (ok, 13) items in employment law because have been quite a few developments.

  1. Governor Lamont issued new Executive Orders this week amending the travel

If you recall way back in March, Governor Ned Lamont declared a civil preparedness and public health emergency which granted his office broad powers.  Those powers have been seen with various Executive Orders that have followed.

That declaration was set to expire today, September 9th.

However, a few days ago, the Governor issued a new

You may recall that President Trump issued a memorandum earlier in August 2020 directing the Treasury Secretary to defer the withholding, despite and payment of the employee portion of social security tax for certain employees.

On Friday, the Secretary released a new notice on that point; however, as my colleagues explain in a new post