In broad terms, the First Amendment prohibits public employers from retaliating against employees who engage in "protected speech".   (Connecticut has a statute, Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 31-51q that purports to apply the First Amendment to private employers too.)  But proving these cases remains difficult for employees.  

And even victories may later end up as

A former Branford Facilities Manager’s claims that his employment was terminated due to protected speech and his political affiliation were effectively dismissed on Friday, February 25th when a federal court granted the employer’s motion for summary judgment.

The 40-page opinion provides good roadmap for employers (and their attorneys) to understanding such claims and what is

There is an unspoken truth about the Superior Courts in Connecticut: Summary judgment for employers in employment-related claims is typically a long shot. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule.

A case to be released by the Connecticut Appellate Court next week shows the difficulty but also shows that at least with regard to

In employment discrimination cases, some of the day-to-day details of a person’s employment are sometimes disputed.   Did an employee "continually" cry at work or only "occasionally" cry? And does it matter?

A recent Connecticut district court decision clarified that such trivial disputes about an employee’s background — without more — are not enough to be

If you’re an employer with an appeal to the Second Circuit, having the EEOC write a brief on behalf of the Plaintiff-employee is not one of those things that portends well for the case.

So, when the Second Circuit issued its decision in Pucino v. Verizon Communications (download here), perhaps the writing was already on

With a possible snowstorm coming this weekend (or not) and another next week, no doubt there will be the usual rushing out to get milk and bread. But before you do so, here’s a bevy of stories from the last week to keep you updated on the latest in employment law affecting employers in