The supervisor did it.

Yep, you’ve concluded that he sent unwanted texts to his subordinate telling her she looked “beautiful.”  Maybe even stopped by her hotel room unannounced one night at a conference for a “nightcap”.

While the subordinate’s career does not appear to have been harmed in the legal sense (i.e. there’s no “tangible

Time and again, pundits suggest that the U.S. Supreme Court now is among the most conservative in decades and, by extension, pro-business.

If that’s the case, they’re going to be awfully surprised with today’s 8-0 ruling in Staub v. Proctor Hospital (download here) in which the court broadened the methods that an employee can use

Not everything that happens in the workplace can give rise to a viable discrimination or retaliation claim.  Various courts have emphasized that there must be an "adverse employment action". Otherwise, a claim will go nowhere.

But what exactly IS an adverse employment action? A new federal court case in Connecticut — in borrowing from judicial dictum