Late Sunday evening, a new Executive Order and new DECD guidance were both released clarifying the “Stay at Home. Stay Safe” rule that goes into effect Monday at 8 p.m.

Executive Order 7J amends the Friday order in two important ways:

  1. It permits non-essential retailers to be staffed on site, provided that they may only

The news late Friday was not unexpected. The Governor is shutting down the offices of non-essential businesses including non-profits.

But if I had told you two weeks ago that Connecticut would be issuing an order telling non-essential businesses that their offices would have to close, I’m not sure I would’ve had many believers.

And yet,

Thursday brought still another busy day of news as increased testing in Connecticut brought a big jump in numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases. 

We’re starting to hear about employers considering furloughing employees instead of simply laying them off.

(Though the numbers of layoffs in Connecticut is over 54,000 — since Friday.)

In general terms, a

Wednesday was supposed to be the first day of vacation for me and my family in Florida.

Instead, I spent it at home helping clients run from one crisis to another.

It’s pretty amazing how quickly all of our lives have changed so dramatically.

Also amazing: Congress passed major legislation on leave related to COVID-19. 

As Connecticut reported it’s first known COVID-19 cases over the weekend, it is becoming apparent that the time for preparation for a pandemic is starting to end, and the time for action items is beginning.

To that end, it seems that nearly every lawfirm is starting to compile answers to some frequently asked questions.

For

Back in 2009, it was hard not to miss press coverage of the H1N1 virus.  In fact, I wrote a series of posts about how employers could prepare for a possible pandemic while still complying with employment laws.

Flash forward to now, and press reports are coming out daily about a new (novel) coronavirus

Six months after a little-noticed bill passed unanimously by the General Assembly (and was then vetoed by Governor Lamont), a new compromise measure passed yesterday in a special session.  For a full article, check out CT Mirror’s coverage here or CTNewsJunkie here.

The bill uses some of the same concepts that had been previously discussed,

A hearing is set for Thursday on draft legislation to “fix” a bill that had been earlier vetoed and that I discussed in a post earlier this weekCTNewsJunkie.com was first to report on the details earlier Wednesday.

The bill comes at an interesting crossroads in restaurant wage/hour law. Earlier this week, the U.S.