At a Sentencing Commssion hearing last week, former state lawmaker Ernie Newton — who was convicted in 2006 on corruption charges — urged commission members to address hiring discrimination against ex-felons, reports CT News Junkie.  There is no indication yet that they will do so, but his comments raised some eyebrows in the press.

Newton’s

UPDATED June 9, 2011 – The House approved the measure late last night, June 8th. For additional details, see this updated post.

In the closing hours of the General Assembly’s term, the Connecticut Senate has passed a bill yesterday that would ban the use of credit reports by employers in many situations.

Senate Bill

While some matters get all the headlines, the work of the state and federal courts move on.  One such case came out earlier this week and I highlight it because it touches on a point that employers sometimes lose sight of — the ability to still make subjective decisions and have that decision supported by

It’s been a little while since I’ve discussed quirky statutes that are often overlooked or misunderstood when talking about employment laws in Connecticut. Certainly, the drug testing laws in Connecticut may not be overlooked, but portions of it are often misunderstood.

Indeed, I suspect that many employers (and lawyers) are unaware that an "employee" as defined in the

For employers in Connecticut, this isn’t exactly the best of times. But it isn’t the worst of times either. That seemed to be the message of a variety of economists at a conference I attended yesterday sponsored by the Connecticut Business & Industry Association.

In fact, a CBIA survey released yesterdacourtesy morgue filey (and sponsored by

With iPods becoming ubiquitous, I’m sure I’m not the only one who feels like they are listening to more music in general.  A favorite song of mine is "So Much to Say" by the Dave Matthews Band song.  (Don’t try reading too much into the lyricsPublic Domain — there isn’t much there.)  But this week, "So Much to