Legislative Developments

Led, in part, by a crusade from former Fox News hosts Gretchen Carlson and Julie Roginsky, who settled private cases with Fox News involving sexual harassment and signed non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), we’re likely to see a bill at the General Assembly this year to ban employers’ use of NDAs and non-disparagement agreements in discrimination complaints.

A significant change has gone into effect New York City effective on November 22, 2023 with an amendment to the city’s Human Rights law.

The key focus of this amendment is the prohibition of discrimination based on an individual’s height and weight in employment, housing, and public accommodations.

The law prohibits NYC employers — that

I recently was able to attend the American Bar Association Labor & Employment Law Section Annual Conference — this time in Seattle. It’s a conference I’ve posted about many times before.

There were several good programs that were held which I hope to write about in upcoming posts. One of them covered the topic of

I’ve been writing this blog for so long that at the time I started, podcasts weren’t really a thing. (Neither were law blogs, but that’s a different post.)

Last year, my colleague Gabe Jiran hosted a season of From Lawyer to Employer — a new podcast at my firm, Shipman & Goodwin. The first season

I know. It’s nearly July 4th weekend. No one REALLY wants to hear about employment law in Connecticut.

So for this post, let’s go right over the border to New York where something very interesting is taking place.

Last week, the NY legislature passed a ban on non-compete agreements. Now, before you rip up such

The legislative session wrapped up last week and if you were on the lookout for lots of new employment law-related measures, you were likely to have been disappointed.

Despite serious changes to the state’s non-compete laws being discussed as well as expansion of the state’s paid leave laws having passed a committee, only a handful

While all eyes are on the General Assembly for the developments for this year, we’re still dealing with a law passed several years ago raising the minimum wage.

Effective June 1, 2023, the minimum wage is now at $15 per hour.

Public Act 19-4 requires the minimum wage to increase five times over a five-year

One month to go in the legislative session. So there are lots of bills that are technically “under consideration”.

But let’s face it: Only a small portion of them will receive enough votes to pass the legislature. With a filibuster in play, only those bills that can garner some bi-partisan support are likely to be