Legislative Developments

If 2020 was a year full of twists and hairpin turns, 2021 is proving to be a worthy successor — at least when it comes to paid leave.

There are a lot of news articles out there but I thought a quick recap of where we are (and where we are expecting to go) would

Over the last week, while many of us were trying to catch up on our stay-cations,  Congress passed and the President signed The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Applications Act.

It’s a 5,593-page appropriations bill so I’m going to guess that you haven’t read it.

Spoiler Alert: Neither have I.

But thankfully, my colleagues Jarad

Over Thanksgiving, I did something novel (at least for me): I painted my home office space.

That, of course, led to the realization that the carpet was hopelessly outdated and, since we were at it, the light fixture was falling apart, and the desk and chair I was working from for the last 9 months

Thanksgiving is now in the rear view mirror. Just a month to go until we turn the page to 2021.

But before that happens, there are a few things left to check off your to do list for 2020.

Let’s get to it.

  1. Register for Paid Leave Program – Conneticut requires every employer to register

Well, it’s over.

Joe Biden will be the next President of the United States effective January 20, 2021.

For employers, the last several years have been filled with several retreats from existing policies.   And over the last year in particular, the Trump administration was busy rolling out new regulations for employers to follow.  It’s not

As employers start to return employees to the physical workplace, new issues keep arising daily.  Here’s a common scenario:

Employee X has been on furlough since late March and collecting more on unemployment than if he had been employed, thanks to the extra $600 weekly payment.

Employer now asks Employee to return to work.  Although

Thursday brought still another busy day of news as increased testing in Connecticut brought a big jump in numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases. 

We’re starting to hear about employers considering furloughing employees instead of simply laying them off.

(Though the numbers of layoffs in Connecticut is over 54,000 — since Friday.)

In general terms, a

The EEOC has long advised that asking about date of birth on job applications was a particularly bad idea.

The ADEA does not explicitly prohibit an employer from asking an applicant’s age or date of birth. However, such inquiries may deter older workers from applying for employment or may otherwise indicate possible intent to discriminate