Legislative Developments

As I’ve hinted in some prior posts, my colleagues and I have been working on an all-new labor & employment webinar series for this fall. Today, I get to announce it.

This webinar series will feature in-depth legal insights and practical takeaways for human resource professionals as well as business stakeholders and decision makers on

As I continue a deeper dive into new Connecticut employment laws, Public Act 21-27 adds three new parameters for the existing requirement that an employer provide a lactation room or other location in the workplace for a mother to express her milk.

Previously, Conn. Gen. Stat. § 31-40w only required that such room or location

As the Delta variant continues make its presence known, more employers are continuing to explore mandatory vaccination policies for their staff.  This comes on the heels of Governor Lamont’s executive order that requires teachers and others to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing.

My colleagues and I have been fielding questions on

Continuing my deeper dive this week into new laws from the General Assembly, today’s post tackles Public Act 21-69, which goes into effect October 1, 2021.

The law amends existing law by making it a discriminatory practice for an employer or an employer’s agent to request or require an applicant provide their:

  • age
  • date

As I continued my deep dive into all the new items of legislation, today will focus on an act that amends the law regarding training and statute of limitations for complaints .

Public Act 21-109 (Senate Bill No. 1023) makes some changes to the affirmative action law which I won’t cover here. But there are

If you’ve read this blog long enough, you know that certain workers are classified as “exempt” from the overtime requirements. The most well-known of these are the white-collar exemptions of executive, administrative and professional personnel.

But state law has several other categories of exemptions you may never have heard about such as a chief

A new website by Connecticut on cannabis use was announced by Governor Lamont’s administration over the weekend.   Unfortunately, it contains an error regarding the cannabis use and the workplace; it highlights the mess that has been created by the General Assembly on the cannabis bill.

Here’s one example.

Over the weekend, the website began

This week, my colleague Sarah Westby and I published a detailed look at the new legal cannabis law in Connecticut and what it means for employers. I’m not going to duplicate the post here but strongly encourage you to read it.

One thing that didn’t make it in the post was strange provision found in

Lost amid the press regarding the new law legalizing cannabis use is the fact that the law also restricts smoking far more in the workplace and affords employers more flexibility as well.

The new law requires employers to to ban smoking and e-cigarette use in any area of the workplace (this will apply to tobacco