Somewhere, some employer might be thinking: Hey, why don’t I make employees sign a promissory note to pay me back if they leave before six months! That would be a great idea!

It would also be against the law.

Thus, the next installment of the Employment Law Checklist Project #emplawchecklist.  The law is set forth

Suppose your company has an incentive bonus plan that bases a bonus on the specific work done during a calendar year.  Bonus payments are made 90 days after the end of the calendar year on an “Award payment date.”

But your bonus plan has an important provision.  That provision states that “Participants must be employed

Back in June, the Connecticut Supreme Court issued its decision in Ziotas v. The Reardon Law Firm — a significant ruling because it found that where a bonus is discretionary and is not ascertainable by applying a formula, it did not constitute "wages". 

I talked about the case in a lengthy post and noted that

UPDATED

Various blogs have started to link to this one today after AIG released a white paper to support its assertion that it was required to make payments to various executives and employees over the last week.

It turns out that the retention plan at issue is to be construed under Connecticut’s wage and hour laws.  As bloggers and commentators will quickly

Remember a Connecticut appellate decision a few weeks ago that suggested that a bonus allegedly promised to an associate could be "wages" under Connecticut’s wage statutes? Indeed, a fellow Connecticut blogger suggested that 2008 was shaping to be a banner ynot public domain - see original link at morgue fileear for employees.

Well, not so fast. A new Connecticut Supreme Court decision today