So yesterday, I made a convincing case that employees who smoke outside the workplace can’t be treated differently than your non-smokers. 

But what about your health insurance plans? Doesn’t the state law prohibit your plan from imposing higher premium costs on those smokers?

Well on first glance it appears yes.  The state law would seem

Back in February, a federal court in Connecticut dismissed a lawsuit brought by three former wrestlers who contended, among other things, that they were improperly classified as independent contractors.

The case garnered national attention (see, for example, this post by Zach Lowe at The American Lawyer) for a variety of reasons, including the disclosure

The slow season of employment law news continues, which makes this a perfect time to roll-out the occasional Quick Takes post to discuss interesting nuggets and updates to recent posts.

Continuing a theme this week of followups to older posts, back in February the U.S. Supreme Court, in Larue v. DeWolff, ruled that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) allows an employee to sue his employer because of a fiduciary breach that resulted in individual losses to his 401(k) plan.

Some predicted that the "Court’s