Earlier this week, Governor Ned Lamont issued a press release supporting Senate Bill 12 which would dramatically expand the scope of the state’s current Paid Sick Leave law.

Currently, Paid Sick Leave is available to “service workers” at certain employers with 50 or more employees. Passed in 2011, the law requires that these workers receive

Led, in part, by a crusade from former Fox News hosts Gretchen Carlson and Julie Roginsky, who settled private cases with Fox News involving sexual harassment and signed non-disclosure agreements (NDAs), we’re likely to see a bill at the General Assembly this year to ban employers’ use of NDAs and non-disparagement agreements in discrimination complaints.

The legislative session wrapped up last week and if you were on the lookout for lots of new employment law-related measures, you were likely to have been disappointed.

Despite serious changes to the state’s non-compete laws being discussed as well as expansion of the state’s paid leave laws having passed a committee, only a handful

In a non-election year, the Connecticut legislature always seems to be extra busy considering workplace-related bills.

This year is no exception. If anything, it feels like it’s hit another gear. CTNewsJunkie had a detailed article yesterday about the subject.

The Labor & Public Employees Committee has considered, and is considering, a wide array of bills

The last several years have seen significant pieces of legislation pass the Connecticut General Assembly impacting employers in several ways.

Think about the following items in the last few years:

  • Ban on
  • As I’ve said in prior posts, the General Assembly isn’t exactly precise at times when writing legislation.  (One is reminded by the quote regarding sausage making.)

    One issue that pops up from time to time is whether an employer need be “Connecticut-based” to be covered by Connecticut state laws, particularly as it applies to

    With union organizing efforts making headlines at Amazon and Starbucks, a new bill in Connecticut is designed to make it even easier for unions to win organizing votes.

    A bill banning so-called “captive audience” meetings won final approval from the Connecticut General Assembly late Friday; it moves to the Governor’s office where his approval

    The “short” session of the Connecticut General Assembly is wrapping up early next month so it’s a good opportunity to take a peek at the items that are still in contention for passage this term.  Many of the bills that are still being considered relate to the “labor” side of Labor & Employment Law.  Here