The last several years have seen significant pieces of legislation pass the Connecticut General Assembly impacting employers in several ways.

Think about the following items in the last few years:

  • Ban on
  • As I’ve said in prior posts, the General Assembly isn’t exactly precise at times when writing legislation.  (One is reminded by the quote regarding sausage making.)

    One issue that pops up from time to time is whether an employer need be “Connecticut-based” to be covered by Connecticut state laws, particularly as it applies to

    With union organizing efforts making headlines at Amazon and Starbucks, a new bill in Connecticut is designed to make it even easier for unions to win organizing votes.

    A bill banning so-called “captive audience” meetings won final approval from the Connecticut General Assembly late Friday; it moves to the Governor’s office where his approval

    The “short” session of the Connecticut General Assembly is wrapping up early next month so it’s a good opportunity to take a peek at the items that are still in contention for passage this term.  Many of the bills that are still being considered relate to the “labor” side of Labor & Employment Law.  Here

    A few years ago, I talked with some students about a report they were doing for NPR about how hairstyles and race have been historically intertwined.

    Earlier this week, the Connecticut General Assembly gave final approval a bill that seeks to right some of these historical wrongs by making it illegal to discriminate in employment

    With many workplaces now going on a year with remote workers, issues that were thought to be temporary blips are turning into major headaches.

    Suppose your office in Stamford, Connecticut is closed and employee are allowed to work remotely.

    What happens to those New York residents who are now working from home 24/7?

    What about

    A hearing is set for Thursday on draft legislation to “fix” a bill that had been earlier vetoed and that I discussed in a post earlier this weekCTNewsJunkie.com was first to report on the details earlier Wednesday.

    The bill comes at an interesting crossroads in restaurant wage/hour law. Earlier this week, the U.S.

    Update: Governor Lamont vetoed this bill on July 12, 2019.  

    Bear with me because this is a story about how a little provision slipped in at the last minute and buried deep in a innocuously-titled bill will have big implications for the restaurant industry in Connecticut.

    You might have missed House Bill 5001 (now Public