We continue with our series of posts (see prior posts here, here, here, and here) on the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance issued by the Connecticut Department of Labor earlier this month. Today’s post focuses on the “carryover” rules.

Another issue that the Paid Sick Leave addresses is the “carryover” rules —

Last week, I touched on a few aspects of the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance that was released by the Connecticut Department of Labor. (For prior posts, see here, here and here.) Today, I continue to discuss the guidance with a look at when service workers can start using accumulated paid sick leave.

This is the second in a series of posts on the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance from the Connecticut Department of Labor.

Back in June, I discussed who is a “service worker” under the new Paid Sick Leave law.  It is a detailed list that  includes butchers and bakers but not candlestick makers.

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When I reviewed the Paid Sick Leave Guidance released Friday by the Connecticut Department of Labor, I happened to be in Chicago for the day.  And where should I pass by? But Harry Caray’s.

The renowned Cubs broadcaster’s catchphrase was “Holy Cow!” And that phrase was stuck in my head for the weekend.

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The Connecticut Department of Labor has issued its long-awaited guidance this morning on the new Paid Leave Law that becomes effective on January 1, 2012.

You can download the CTDOL’s guidance here.

My cursory review of the guidance indicates that it answers some questions that have been floating out there — albeit in ways

This morning, I had the opportunity to speak to a group of some pretty smart people in the hospitality industry about Connecticut’s Paid Sick Leave law, which goes into effect on January 1, 2012.  After all, with the movie Contagion as the nation’s number one movie, sickness is something on people’s minds.

(I’ve previously

To the surprise of absolutely no one, earlier this month Governor Malloy signed the new Paid Sick Leave and the new Gender Identity Anti-Discrimination bills.

With the Governor’s approval, the paid sick leave bill now becomes effective January 1, 2012.

The anti-discrimination provisions of the gender identity bill are effective October 1, 2011.

For more

Remember how I indicated that most of the paid sick leave bill covers only “service workers”? That’s true, but there is a big exception that hasn’t been mentioned much elsewhere.

Indeed, employers who have 50 or more employees should beware: The new Paid Sick Leave bill’s anti-retaliation provisions may cover all employees, not just the