starrMy colleague Gary Starr sits next to my office and sometimes we bounce ideas off each other. One of the things we were talking about recently was a new case that discussed an employer’s obligations to enter into the interactive process.  

This often comes up in ADA cases where the employee may need a reasonable

Busy week here.  So, it’s time to bring back a recurring post of “Quick Hits” of articles you may have missed along the way.  Here are some of my recent favorites:

The Connecticut Appellate Court will officially release an opinion next week that reaffirms that the interactive process required by both the Americans with Disabilities Act and the state law equivalent to discuss a reasonable accommodation to a disability, requires the employee to engage in the process as well.

The case, Festa v. Board of

Nearly six months ago, a landmark ruling by the Connecticut Supreme Court held that Connecticut’s anti-discrimination laws required employers to provide a reasonable accommodation to disabled workers, much like the federal counterpart, the ADA.

As I noted in an earlier post about the case, Curry v. Allen S. Goodman, Inc., the Court suggested that the employer had a

President Bush’s signature is expected any day now on the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (click for my prior posts here), which represent some of the most important changes to federal employment laws in over a decade.  For employers in Connecticut, there is going to need to be some synthesis with Connecticut’s anti-discrimination laws so

Last month, I addressed the Connecticut Supreme Court’s decision in Curry v. Allan S. Goodman, which expanded state disability laws to match (or in some cases, exceed) the scope of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The employer has moved, on limited grounds, to have the court reconsider its decision.  You can download a

I’ve returned from vacation today with hundreds of e-mails to dig through and about 3000 posts in various RSS feeds.

But one e-mail I received relating to the Connecticut Supreme Court’s decision earlier this month in Curry v. Allan S. Goodman, bears some immediate discussion. The comments are from Attorney Richard Hayber, the attorney representing

Reading the Connecticut Supreme Court case of Curry v. Allan S. Goodman, Inc. decided last week,  I’m struck by how many questions the decision seems to raise — and how many are left unanswered. I’ve discussed the case and some questions it raises before, most recently hereCourtesy Morgue File - "Hide Face"

The case appears to stand for the

Like the television show, Lost, reading the Connecticut Supreme Court’s decision in Curry v. Allan S. Goodman, Inc. will leave readers with more questions than answers at the end of the day.  (For more background on the case, see this prior post.)

Those unanswered and indeed, troubling questions arise from the suggestion by the