I know. It’s nearly July 4th weekend. No one REALLY wants to hear about employment law in Connecticut.

So for this post, let’s go right over the border to New York where something very interesting is taking place.

Last week, the NY legislature passed a ban on non-compete agreements. Now, before you rip up such

Back in 2019, I wrote this:

For employers, the time is ripe to think about a new strategy going forward. That strategy may focus on protection of confidential information and specific non-solicitation clauses. Regardless, the time of using non-compete agreements broadly may be coming to an end soon.

The recent announcement of the proposed

Earlier today, my colleague Sarah Niemiroski and I drafted the following alert which has been cross-posted at our firm’s website.

In a move with profound implications for workplaces, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) on Thursday, January 5, 2023, issued a sweeping proposal that would ban all non-compete agreements between employers and employees. While the timing

As I’ve mentioned before, our firm has been producing a series of free webinars covering various employment law topics our clients have asked us to talk about. You can watch any of our recorded webinars and find more information about our upcoming presentations here.

I recently presented with my colleagues Sarah Niemiroski and Sheridan King

It’s late March, which means that it’s too soon to predict which bills at the Connecticut General Assembly are going to have enough support for final passage, but not too soon to take a look at what is on the table.

By “on the table”, I mean bills that have been voted out of the

At the stroke of midnight last night, the 2019 General Assembly came to a close.

I think it’s fair to say that 2019 will go down in history not for the number of bills impacting employers, but for the breadth of the few that passed.

I’ve recapped the bills in some prior posts, but here’s

Buried deep in the budget (page 417 of 567) that was passed by the state House last night is this provision:

Sec. 305. (NEW) (Effective from passage) For purposes of this section “covenant not to compete” means any contract or agreement that restricts the right of an individual to provide homemaker, companion or home health

If April Showers bring May…Oh never mind. In Connecticut, April might as well mean that the General Assembly is getting serious about the bills under consideration.  All the proposals that make headlines in February mean nothing until committees start to vote on the bills and the bills start getting the spotlight on them.

Usually by