Throw out the release?

The situation is a common one.

  • Employer terminates the employment of an employee.
  • Employer provides a severance agreement with its signature already affixed. 
  • Employee signs it and returns the agreement to the employer.
  • Employer, likely reviewing just the signature, pays the severance.

But here’s where things get

The title of this post is, of course, a bit misleading.  Any lawyer will tell you that each employment case you may have is unique and that any settlement must take into account the facts and circumstances of the particular case.

All true.  And, if your company is negotiating a settlement, you ought to have

Earlier this month, I posted on a bill pending before the Connecticut General Assembly that would have changed the statute of limitations for filing employment discrimination claims and allowed a Complainant to ask for a release of jurisdiction of the CHRO as soon as possible.

This week, the Labor & Public Employee Committee approved of

From time to time, employers are faced with a quandary: When an employee has not been following the rules, do I fire the employee straight up? Or do I give the employee an opportunity to resign first, and potentially sign a settlement agreement?

Why might an employer do that? Well, it allows the employee to save face

In a hearing earlier today, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission discussed the "devastating impact" that age discrimination has on workplaces and employees.

For employers, however, the most notable item from the hearing was the release of new technical guidance regarding separation agreements and the waivers of age discrimination claims contained in such agreements.  You can

Addressing the legal risks associated with a reduction in force (or "RIF") has long been a topic on this blog. In fact, looking in my crystal ball way back in January 2008, I suggested that it would the hot topic before years’ end

Flash forward to the present, and the headlines continue to be

With all the talk about layoffs, separation agreements have moved front-and-center to the discussion on how companies can reduce their liability exposure.

But how much severance should a company offer to its employees when laying them off?

There is, of course, no set rule in Connecticut — or the United States — on how much severance