So, while everyone has been paying attention to the Ricci v. DeStefano case, which dealt with a group of white firefighters who claim that they should’ve been promoted, another case involving New Haven firefighters has been making its way through the state court system.

(As an aside, are there any firefighters in New Haven

In closing out its 2008-09 term today  the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4, along ideological lines that the city of New Haven violated Title VII in refusing to promote a group of white firefighters and refusing to apply the results of a test that it claimed would have had a disparate impact on minorities.

The

Here’s a warning: If you don’t get involved with labor unions or collective bargaining agreements, you might as well skip over this next post because things don’t get much more technical (or mundane, depending on your perspective) than the following case discussion. 

In a divided 3-2 decision, the Connecticut Supreme Court held that the collective

Ed: Updated to reflect newer posts and correct style

There are many employment lawyers who subscribe to the belief that "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished".  A case out of Connecticut and the Second Circuit this month certainly won’t change that perception.  Indeed, although the case may have political undertones, it sets up a classic