As I continued my deep dive into all the new items of legislation, today will focus on an act that amends the law regarding training and statute of limitations for complaints .

Public Act 21-109 (Senate Bill No. 1023) makes some changes to the affirmative action law which I won’t cover here. But there are

As post-vaccination life kicks in, the complications for employers continue to mount.  No doubt life was a lot harder on lockdown, but some individual decisions for employers were easy — just work from home.

But over the last few weeks, judging from the calls I’m fielding from employers of all sizes, there’s a desire to

Today, I bring back one of my favorite recurring features – my conversations with employee-side attorney Nina Pirrotti.

As we’ve moved our conversations (“The Dialogue”) from written to virtual format, we still find the effects on employment law by the pandemic to be wide-ranging.  While vaccinations are welcome, the move to remote work has created

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year. 

It’s the time when I delve into the annual report of case statistics released by the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.  It’s a time to look for trends. And yes, I get excited about this report every year.

The most obvious trend? Case filings are down.

Thanksgiving is now in the rear view mirror. Just a month to go until we turn the page to 2021.

But before that happens, there are a few things left to check off your to do list for 2020.

Let’s get to it.

  1. Register for Paid Leave Program – Conneticut requires every employer to register

Oh Halloween.

You have a tendency to make employment lawyers busy.

For instance, there was that time when an employee made comments about a co-worker “taking a girlfriend dressed as a 747 to a Halloween party and bringing her in for a landing” when the co-worker was gay and had no girlfriend. Harassment? (Hansen

Every four years I have a dream that an employment law question will be asked at a Presidential Debate.

I have yet to have that dream realized. And if the topics of debate moderator Chris Wallace are to be believed, we will have to wait (still further) for such questions at an upcoming debate.

With little fanfare, the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities updated its website to note that it was giving a blanket 90 day extension of time for all employers to complete the sexual harassment prevention training.

Previously, that deadline was set for October 1, 2020. While it was granting a 90 day extension of time

13 years ago this week, I started this blog. But rather than dwell on another anniversary (and six months since working from home), I’d rather spend the time hitting a few (ok, 13) items in employment law because have been quite a few developments.

  1. Governor Lamont issued new Executive Orders this week amending the travel

There’s just a few weeks to go (absent an extension) for employers to get their employees trained on sexual harassment prevention.  October 1, 2020 will be here before you know it.

I’ve talked about it in prior posts so there should be no surprise.

And yet, with the pandemic, it’s easy to see how this