crybabyThe Connecticut Law Tribune reported earlier this month on a new Connecticut Supreme Court case that, for the first time, allowed claims brought by kids to proceed based on injuries suffered by their parents.

Plaintiffs’ lawyers have a new weapon in their arsenal. The state Supreme Court, in a split decision, has ruled that Connecticut

paperI’m a big P!nk (yes, the exclamation point) fan. One of her most recent hits, is a song “Just Give Me A Reason”.

Somehow, reading a new Appellate Court case that will be officially released tomorrow, this song title kept sticking in my brain.

The case, Madigan v. Housing Authority of East Hartford (download

With all the talk about the state’s implementation of medical marijuana laws, it’s easy to wonder what impact those laws will have on terminating employees who use marijuana on the job.

One recent Superior Court decision gave a pretty clear answer for state employees: None.  In other words, for employers: Fire Away.

That, of course,

First off, let me say that I’m really obsessed with enjoying this year’s World Cup.

But Thursday presents some special problems for employers.  The United States Men’s Team has a very important game at 12 ET.  Right in the middle of the lunch hour (or two?).  Beat or tie Germany and the U.S. is through

It’s tough to draw lessons from appeals of arbitration decisions.

Why? Because the standard to overturn arbitration cases is high and, it’s only when there are really bad facts (or, perhaps more likely, an really bad error in interpreting the law) that appellate courts consider reversing the decision.

That appears to be the case in

On Saturday, the Connecticut General Assembly gave final approval of several revisions to the state’s Personnel Files Act law.  Governor Malloy is expected to approve of the measure.

Senate Bill 910 can be viewed here.  The Office of Legislative Research’s analysis of the bill can be found here.

Here are the key changes: