Effective November 1, 2023, a new version of Form I-9, the Employment Eligibility Verification form, is now the proper version to use — which comes with several significant changes. Here are some of the highlights:

Changes to Procedures

Overall, the new Form I-9 is a shorter and easier way for employers to verify their employees’

I’ve been writing this blog for so long that at the time I started, podcasts weren’t really a thing. (Neither were law blogs, but that’s a different post.)

Last year, my colleague Gabe Jiran hosted a season of From Lawyer to Employer — a new podcast at my firm, Shipman & Goodwin. The first season

For HR professionals and employment lawyers, the basics of FMLA and ADA is an oft-covered topic in law firm webinars.

But I’ve heard from plenty of people that they’re good with the basics; it’s the tricky issues that give them headaches.

With the acknowledgement that one person’s difficult question may be another person’s easy one

Back in June, when the state minimum wage increased to $15 an hour, I warned that because the minimum wage was now tied to the employment cost index for wages and salaries for all civilian workers — as defined by the United States Department of Labor — it was likely to go up effective January

Years ago, I wrote about how state employment law imposed a duty to engage in an interactive dialogue with an employee who had a disability and was requesting a reasonable accommodation.

But what it does it truly mean to engage in an interactive process?

A new case from the Connecticut Appellate Court provides some

As I continue to highlight some important employment law developments from this summer, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) caused a mild stir for employment law lawyers when it issued a decision in Stericycle, Inc.

This ruling introduces a fresh legal standard for assessing employers’ workplace policies and rules, with far-reaching implications for businesses

With summer vacations in full swing, there’s an upcoming deadline that employers should be mindful of coming up at the end of the month.

As CTNewsJunkie reported yesterday:

Connecticut businesses with five or more employees have less than two weeks before a deadline to register with a state-run program intended to provide a retirement savings

In prior posts, I’ve talked about the difficulty for employers in getting a motion for summary judgment granted in state court in discrimination cases.

(Motions for summary judgment are procedural tools that can be used when there are no disputed issues of material fact and therefore the court can decide the case on law