With vaccines rolling out to employees 55 and older on March 1, 2021, employers that thought they may face issues in a few months, now will be front and center for those considerations.

How do you deal with risks and litigation concerns?

My colleagues, Jill O’Toole and Sarah Niemiroski, and I have prepared a quick

Back in October, I provided a preliminary assessment of what a COVID-19 vaccine might mean for employers.  But as I noted back then, the EEOC’s guidance was not yet updated.

Now, the EEOC has finally provided an update of sorts for employers.

In doing so, the new guidance makes plain what many of us suspected

We are still several months away from a vaccine for COVID-19, and probably still even further away from one that will be readily available to the general population.

But I’ve already heard grumblings from employers wondering — can I compel employees to get a vaccine when one is available for the coronavirus?

It’s a

I’m excited. And nervous. And happy. And angry. And energized. And exhausted.

And my oldest daughter hasn’t even started her first day of college next week.

(Proud Dad aside: She’s headed to WPI next week as a freshman where she wants to study aerospace engineering!)

Around Connecticut, the nervousness and excitement has been palpable and

Way back in April, the state first instituted a mandatory mask and face covering rule under Executive Order 7BB. 

On Friday, the state updated it in Executive Order 7NNN by requiring medical documentation in order to be exempt. Here’s all that you need to know on the changes.

The new rule states: “Effective immediately, any

The Connecticut Appellate Court issued a new decision (officially released today) that will have important ramifications for employers proceeding with the CHRO mandatory mediation stage.  Specifically, based on this ruling, most settlement discussions during the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities’ mediation stage will be inadmissible in a later court proceeding.   The decision also holds