A few months ago, I wrote about how artificial intelligence was being introduced in the workplace.

At the ABA Annual Labor & Employment Conference last week, a whole panel discussion was devoted to the legal ramifications of using artificial intelligence — particularly in hiring decisions.

The speakers talked about the EEOC guidance that I

Last week, I attended the ABA Annual Labor & Employment Law Conference — something I’ve written about on this blog pre-pandemic (remember when?).

There were many good programs and I’ll try to talk about some of the other topics in an upcoming blog post or two.

However, one topic that I was interested in

On November 1 at 9 a.m., I’ll be making a return appearance to WNPR’s award-winning Where We Live show.  You can listen live or download it as a podcast.

Tomorrow’s topic is one that we never would’ve dreamed of years ago — Long COVID.

Long COVID is the term that the CDC uses to

Engaging in the interactive process is an important — and sometimes overlooked — part of an employer’s response to a request for a reasonable accommodation under state and federal law.

I talked about this way back in 2008 (!) when the state Supreme Court released it’s landmark Curry v. Allen S. Goodman decision expanding the

As the Delta variant continues make its presence known, more employers are continuing to explore mandatory vaccination policies for their staff.  This comes on the heels of Governor Lamont’s executive order that requires teachers and others to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing.

My colleagues and I have been fielding questions on

Maybe it’s the Delta variant. Or maybe the publicity regarding Walmart and Disney. But over the last two weeks or so, there’s been a renewed interest in whether employers can mandate vaccines in Connecticut.

Indeed, we have been fielding lots of questions from employers (and friends and family) about mandatory vaccination policies.  But many of

Back in October, I provided a preliminary assessment of what a COVID-19 vaccine might mean for employers.  But as I noted back then, the EEOC’s guidance was not yet updated.

Now, the EEOC has finally provided an update of sorts for employers.

In doing so, the new guidance makes plain what many of us suspected

I’m excited. And nervous. And happy. And angry. And energized. And exhausted.

And my oldest daughter hasn’t even started her first day of college next week.

(Proud Dad aside: She’s headed to WPI next week as a freshman where she wants to study aerospace engineering!)

Around Connecticut, the nervousness and excitement has been palpable and