This month, I published a new article for Practicing Law Institute Chronicle entitled Neurodiversity in the Workplace.

The article builds off a post I did last November by taking a look at some of the cases that have tackled the subject.

For those unfamiliar with the topic, I summarized it in the article as

Continuing my series of posts arising from the ABA Labor & Employment Conference earlier this month, one of the most interesting programs I attended was a plenary session on neurodiversity in the workplace.

“Neurodiversity describes the idea that people experience and interact with the world around them in many different ways; there is no one

For HR professionals and employment lawyers, the basics of FMLA and ADA is an oft-covered topic in law firm webinars.

But I’ve heard from plenty of people that they’re good with the basics; it’s the tricky issues that give them headaches.

With the acknowledgement that one person’s difficult question may be another person’s easy one

Years ago, I wrote about how state employment law imposed a duty to engage in an interactive dialogue with an employee who had a disability and was requesting a reasonable accommodation.

But what it does it truly mean to engage in an interactive process?

A new case from the Connecticut Appellate Court provides some

A few months ago, I wrote about how artificial intelligence was being introduced in the workplace.

At the ABA Annual Labor & Employment Conference last week, a whole panel discussion was devoted to the legal ramifications of using artificial intelligence — particularly in hiring decisions.

The speakers talked about the EEOC guidance that I

Last week, I attended the ABA Annual Labor & Employment Law Conference — something I’ve written about on this blog pre-pandemic (remember when?).

There were many good programs and I’ll try to talk about some of the other topics in an upcoming blog post or two.

However, one topic that I was interested in

On November 1 at 9 a.m., I’ll be making a return appearance to WNPR’s award-winning Where We Live show.  You can listen live or download it as a podcast.

Tomorrow’s topic is one that we never would’ve dreamed of years ago — Long COVID.

Long COVID is the term that the CDC uses to

Engaging in the interactive process is an important — and sometimes overlooked — part of an employer’s response to a request for a reasonable accommodation under state and federal law.

I talked about this way back in 2008 (!) when the state Supreme Court released it’s landmark Curry v. Allen S. Goodman decision expanding the

As the Delta variant continues make its presence known, more employers are continuing to explore mandatory vaccination policies for their staff.  This comes on the heels of Governor Lamont’s executive order that requires teachers and others to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly testing.

My colleagues and I have been fielding questions on

Maybe it’s the Delta variant. Or maybe the publicity regarding Walmart and Disney. But over the last two weeks or so, there’s been a renewed interest in whether employers can mandate vaccines in Connecticut.

Indeed, we have been fielding lots of questions from employers (and friends and family) about mandatory vaccination policies.  But many of