Three months ago, on January 22, 2020, when I uploaded my first coronavirus pandemic post (and being one of the first law blogs to post about it substantively), a few people asked me why I already writing about this.

In part, it was because I had been listening to Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director

Updated April 23, 2020 to reflect new EEOC guidance.

It seems clear now that we are far from the end to this pandemic. But, just as clearly, we are now reaching the end of the beginning of this pandemic.

We’ve been staying at home for several weeks and some other states are already considering loosening

Within the last few days, the pace of new guidance from both the state and federal governments has slowed down just a bit.

Now, we seem to be preparing for the next ‘phase’ of this pandemic.

Whatever that looks like.

The state courts have been at a virtual standstill but we are starting to hear

Yesterday, I was able to participate in a webinar for various Fairfield County chambers of commerce on very latest for employers on the CARES Act and more.

Senator Chris Murphy joined the webinar for the first part and noted that a new stimulus package is already being discussed even while we evaluate the existing one. 

As Connecticut reported it’s first known COVID-19 cases over the weekend, it is becoming apparent that the time for preparation for a pandemic is starting to end, and the time for action items is beginning.

To that end, it seems that nearly every lawfirm is starting to compile answers to some frequently asked questions.

For

Over the weekend, President Trump tweeted out that several prominent “‘Progressive’ Democrat Congresswomen” (who, it shouldn’t have to be said but does, are all American citizens, most of whom were born in the United States) should  “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.”

This language has,

It’s sometimes easy to forget that the government shutdown has very real-world implications. Case in point? The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

As of now, it’s closed.  The agency has even posted a notice about it on its’ website. 

That doesn’t mean that the time limits for filing a charge have been extended.   Generally, federal claims