When no one is working, no one needs to get paid leave.

But as the workforce starts returning, smaller businesses — particularly those will less than 50 employees — are starting to feel the impact of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

That law created two new paid leave provisions — the EPSLA and

The United States Department of Labor recently updated its guidance on the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (FMLA+).

My colleagues at Shipman & Goodwin recapped the new guidance here.

One of the key takeaways from is that under the USDOL’s prior guidance and regulations, it

This pandemic is exhausting.

There’s obviously the personal: The “work from home” novelty has worn off and now comes to tough part of trying to find the boundaries of work and home.  Each day feels like it is 16 hours long (maybe because it is sometimes).

Then there’s the professional: We’ve continued to see clients

Just another day in employment law. Wednesday afternoon, the Department of Labor issued new regulations that further expand what was previously known about the paid leave provisions of the EPSLA and the EFMLEA.

You can view the regulations here.    They go into effect immediately.

The regulations are lengthy and we’ll have a full recap on

Before I talk about some developments, I wanted to share a story about David Lat – the founder of the Above The Law blog. He remains hospitalized in serious condition according to a report, still fighting COVID-19 and battling for his life.  (Saturday Update: He’s out of ICU!) He’s just 44 years old with

The flood of information being produced by the government on the pandemic continues.

Last night, the U.S. Department of Labor published a second round of guidance that is designed to help employers manage Paid Sick Leave and paid FMLA leave (EPSL and FMLA+).  (H/T FMLA Insights for the summary.)

This is different than the

As I was saying about some days… Wednesday merits TWO posts.

To paraphrase a popular quote: There are years when nothing happens and there are days (and weeks) when years happen.

The nonstop barrage of news, orders, and other materials continues making updating a blog on the subject feel hopelessly out of date the moment you click “Publish”.

So rather than any lofty posts this

Thursday brought still another busy day of news as increased testing in Connecticut brought a big jump in numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases. 

We’re starting to hear about employers considering furloughing employees instead of simply laying them off.

(Though the numbers of layoffs in Connecticut is over 54,000 — since Friday.)

In general terms, a