We made it halfway through 2020.

I know it FEELS as if it should be December, but just think how long March was!

A lot has changed since the start of the pandemic.  But over the last few weeks, I’ve been hearing from employers wondering where things stand right now. What’s changed? What still

Last night, Governor Lamont issued Executive Order 7PP which, for the most part, confirms what many of us have been expecting for the last week or so.   As I’ve said before, the first round of reopening businesses remains on track for tomorrow (May 20th) but there have been more tweaks over the last day

With a weekend of football championships behind us, this post tackles the privacy developments that employers here in Connecticut need to run down.  Indeed, while I could just pass off two recent posts from my colleagues, it’s worth going through a progression of options.

One development is for the U.S. “patriots”, while another

I’ll never forget the day I drove into Newtown, Connecticut.  As NBC 30’s Gerry Brooks tweeted this morning: How could you?

It was probably the first time I had made my way to that town outside of Danbury.

But that wasn’t the reason I remember that day.

It was the empty hearse outside a church.

My colleague, Gary Starr, returns this morning with a post on a recent case that has implications for employers nationwide.

You wouldn’t think that fingerprinting would be brought into the world of religious accommodations.

After all, the importance of background checks cannot be denied, particularly when the prospective employee is going to work with children

An applicant for a job posting in education lists his most recent relevant experience as occurring in 1973.  You don’t bring him in for an interview.

Is it gender discrimination?

Beyond that, if he says that he is the most qualified candidate — do you have to hire him?

And if you don’t hire the