If you recall way back in March, Governor Ned Lamont declared a civil preparedness and public health emergency which granted his office broad powers.  Those powers have been seen with various Executive Orders that have followed.

That declaration was set to expire today, September 9th.

However, a few days ago, the Governor issued a new

Wednesday was supposed to be the first day of vacation for me and my family in Florida.

Instead, I spent it at home helping clients run from one crisis to another.

It’s pretty amazing how quickly all of our lives have changed so dramatically.

Also amazing: Congress passed major legislation on leave related to COVID-19. 

Wednesday felt like a breaking point. The day when COVID-19 seemed to come out from under your office desk and said “You’re surrounded. Go home.”

NBA – Suspending its season indefinitely.

Schools in Fairfield County – Closed with the likelihood that more schools will follow soon.

Tom Hanks – Another COVID-19 victim.

Of course, this

One of the reasons I’m working on this project is to highlight the mandates and requirements that employers in the state need to follow. Some can lead to possible litigation; some can lead to, well, something less.

Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 31-51jj is an example of the something less. The key language of the provision

As the dust continues to settle from the General Assembly, bills that didn’t get a lot of press beforehand are continuing to come into the light.

One of them is new Public Act 19-95, which was just signed by Governor Lamont yesterday.

The bill treats being a member of the “Civil Air Patrol”

So, by now (Friday morning), your preparations at your workplace should be in full swing.  The latest forecasts this morning call for a landfall on Sunday somewhere along the Connecticut coast (perhaps Bridgeport) with hurricane impacts felt throughout the state.

Irene is Coming

Connecticut has set up some new resources since my post yesterday specifically on Hurricane Irene.  The 8 a.m. update is posted here.   It is frequently updated and also has a list of people to follow on Twitter.

But so far, it’s not easy to find out about all storm-related workplace laws in one place on the state’s website. (How about an update Department of Labor?)

While a blog post cannot address all of the FAQs that might come up, I thought it would be helpful to discuss a few wage/hour issues. As always, consult with your legal counsel/advisor on any specific issues you have and how these laws might apply to your workplace.

Reporting Time or Minimum Daily Earnings Guaranteed: Connecticut has a “reporting time” obligation (as do several of our neighboring states). It is contained in various regulations and applies to certain industries like the “mercantile trade”. You should already be aware of this law, but it has particular application in storm situations where people may not work full shifts.


Continue Reading Hurricane Irene: “Reporting Time” Pay and Other Wage & Hour Issues for Employers

With the snow today, my colleague Michael Lavelle has this timely post about call in pay, particularly as it relates to weather-related jobs.  My thanks to Mick for this contribution, as always. 
 
The winter season brings more weather-related emergencies, and often requires maintenance employees or replacement staff to be on-call with beepers or cell

Tropical Storm Danny (no relation) formed in the Atlantic Ocean late this morning.  It’s still days away from a potential impact on the East Coast but Connecticut IS within the forecasted track’s "cone"

Whether it strengthens to a hurricane and hits Connecticut, or meanders harmlessly into the Atlantic Ocean is for the weather forecasters