2016labordayWhy do we celebrate Labor Day?

And should it be celebrated on a Tuesday instead?

It’s one of those holidays that we celebrate, but my guess is that most people have no idea on the answer.  But several (many?) years ago, I touched on this on the blog and I thought it would be fun

Lucan_J_WebIt’s mostly a coincidence that my colleague, Jarad Lucan returns today with a post on a favorite topic of ours: Holiday parties.  While most of it isn’t groundbreaking (holiday parties haven’t changed all that much over the last decade), Jarad really focuses in on the key issues.

So, enjoy your holiday parties over the next

My colleague, Marc Herman, returns today with a holiday-themed post filled with — workplace safety issues? Read on.

Holiday season shopping . . . the home to nostalgic tunes, perpetual lines, frenzied bargain hunters, overflowing parking lots, and OSHA.

For those who can’t remember your government acronyms, it’s the United States Department of

Over the last few years, I’ve been running a popular post about Columbus Day and the origins of the work holiday in Connecticut.  Indeed, it has its foundation as a federal holiday and is listed in the United States Code (5 U.S.C. Sec. 6103).

Columbus Day is officially on October 12th (celebrating Columbus arrival on October 12, 1492), but it is celebrated on the 2nd Monday in October as a result of the federal law.   So, if you work for a federal or state employer in human resources, or otherwise, you are likely going to have next Monday off. 

But it is also one of those holidays that private employers increasingly have decided do not merit a vacation day.  A survey from a few years ago showed that just  seven percent of employers in California, for example, give the day off to their employees. 

A common question that arises, however, is why? Why do employees for private companies not have to close on a day that has been designated by the federal government as a national holiday?

The answer is actually quite simple: Because Congress didn’t cover private employers in the law.  And state law doesn’t mandate any requirements on private employers either.  And so, while employees may complaint (perhaps rightly) about the difficulty of some child-care arrangements for some closed schools or otherwise, employer continue to have discretion about the days that it designates as holidays. 

Some employers have created their own work-arounds, allowing employees to take 1-3 "floating holidays" for days like this (or other types of holidays, like Yom Kippur or Three Kings Day).  That’s a sensible practice. But regardless, these types of policies should be discussed with employees so everyone knows what day is a holiday and what day isn’t.


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Although I’m heading out on vacation soon, PUBLISHED with written authorization of Kevin Duffy - NOT to be Reproduced www.kevinduffy.netemployment lawyers sometimes can’t resist a good employment law-related holiday cartoon. 

I recently came across this and believe you all will appreciate the humor in this as well. 

(Though it does remind me last year’s charges against a patron who was allegely a bit "frisky" with a mall’s Santa