One of the reasons I’m working on this project is to highlight the mandates and requirements that employers in the state need to follow. Some can lead to possible litigation; some can lead to, well, something less.

Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 31-51jj is an example of the something less. The key language of the provision

A few months ago, I reported on the District Court’s decision in Amara v. CIGNA, an important class-action case on ERISA retirement benefits and on alleged misrepresentations made by the Company about retirement benefits.  Over the last few months, then, the court was asked to consider the issue of what is appropriate relief from the

Lawyers representing the class of retirees from CIGNA will argue that their clients are entitled to "hundreds of millions" of dollars in retirement benefits as a result of misrepresentations made by CIGNA, according to a report in yesterday’s Hartford Courant. 

The Courant — which finally reported on the decision 5 days after it came

Difficult, time-consuming, and expensive litigation with uncertain results – such as this case represents – is assuredly not a sensible way to manage the Nation’s retirement system for either employers or employees. Sadly, at least for now, litigation appears to be the only option available to them.

In a 122 page opus on ERISA law

In recent years, some employers have turned to EPLI (or employment practices liability insurance) to help control their costs. Some find it useful, others do not. But one important part of having the insurance is making sure it applies when you actually have a claim.

A recent federal court case highlights the importance of notifying the insurer of the claims