You remember the first “real” week of the pandemic, right? The NBA shut down. Then the schools. And then we were all shopping for toilet paper.  Things were moving at light speed.

Yesterday brought back a lot of those memories and stress.

First, the CDC said that fully vaccinated individuals could drop their masks.

If you thought the new Biden White House would take it easy on the use of Executive Orders, you haven’t been paying attention.  President Biden has been indicating that he would use Executive Orders liberally in the first few days to either develop policy or turn around policies that he believes should be revoked.

The

Where are the clusters of COVID-19 coming from?

That was the subject of a state report that was recently reported on by The Hartford Courant.

When a team of Connecticut officials traced 84 coronavirus clusters to their origin points, they found that the vast majority of those clusters stemmed from four places: restaurants, workplaces, homes

What do you think of masks?

Strangely, it seems a loaded question of late.  How masks became a political hot potato is something that historians will debate.

Yesterday, Connecticut tried out a new slogan encouraging common-sense use of masks. The new slogan? “If you have to ask, wear a mask”.

But that’s not the full

Three months ago, on January 22, 2020, when I uploaded my first coronavirus pandemic post (and being one of the first law blogs to post about it substantively), a few people asked me why I already writing about this.

In part, it was because I had been listening to Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director

Wednesday evening is the first night of Passover — one of my favorite Jewish holidays. (And, not surprisingly, not the first time I’ve written about it.)

Why? Traditionally, it is one of the few times the entire extended family gets together and celebrates with great homemade food.

Think matzo ball soup, gefilte fish, hard-boiled

Back in 2009, it was hard not to miss press coverage of the H1N1 virus.  In fact, I wrote a series of posts about how employers could prepare for a possible pandemic while still complying with employment laws.

Flash forward to now, and press reports are coming out daily about a new (novel) coronavirus

Ten years ago today, I wrote about the then-Tenth Anniversary of one of the horrible events that made a lasting impact on Connecticut employers.

I recounted the Connecticut Lottery shootings that happened a decade earlier.

Today, marks 20 years. (The CT Mirror has another perspective here.)

The New York Times report of that event is