In my prior post, I wondered aloud whether there were some rough waters ahead for employers.  Apple recently announced that it would not meet it’s earnings estimates in the first quarter of 2019, in part because of soft demand from China. Other companies are expected to announce some similar issues.

Honestly, I’ve had enough conversations

You do a blog long enough and everything comes full circle.  Back in January 2008, I took out my crystal ball and suggested that reductions in force (RIFs) and lawsuits would soon follow.

We all know what happened next. The economy crashed and discrimination claims at the EEOC peaked at their highest levels in more

One of the better programs run by the Connecticut Department of Labor that gets almost zero publicity is the “Shared Work” program.  For employers, it’s a useful tool when you’re dealing with a temporary slowdown in work.

I talked about it five (!) years ago in the midst of the recession so I’m not going

Last month, I highlighted a federal case in Connecticut where the court threw out an age discrimination claim because the evidence presented by the employee was not strong enough to survive a summary judgment claim.

A new federal court case however has allowed an age discrimination claim to proceed even while noting that while the

Last month, I discussed the topic of furloughs, which have become an attractive option to employers in lieu of layoffs.

Recently, the United States Department of Labor issued a "fact sheet" that provided additional guidance for employers to some frequently asked questions on the topic. 

As the Employer Law Report said,  "While the fact sheet

At a CBIA seminar yesterday where I spoke, several speakers discussed the challenges that exist for companies in these economic times. One CBIA economist projected that the current recession will not bottom out in Connecticut until late summer or fall 2009.

But the times also present opportunities, as well, the speakers said. Indeed, now may be

With all the talk about layoffs, separation agreements have moved front-and-center to the discussion on how companies can reduce their liability exposure.

But how much severance should a company offer to its employees when laying them off?

There is, of course, no set rule in Connecticut — or the United States — on how much severance

The headlines over the weekend for Connecticut have not been kind.  Two were particularly striking. First, the Courant ran a story entitled "Sizable Job Losses Expected in State".  The second wCourtesy morgue file "depression"as a story about the expected closing of The Goodwin Hotel, one of Hartford’s premier hotels. 

Both indicate a local economy that