Lately, I’ve been talking with more employers about permanent reductions in force.

It’s not fun.

And it’s not something I thought we’d be talking about 3 months ago, and yet it’s not foreign to me either.

In fact, I spent several of my earliest posts here on this exact topic. 

As I talk with employers

Last week, I posted about a proposed Governor’s bill that would expand the training requirements for some employers.

However, that appears to be just a small part of a wider political battle that is about to be raised.

Yesterday, a group of Senate Democrats proposed, according to a handout, the “Largest Overhaul in Modern Connecticut

So, a couple of months back, I talked about how separation agreements for small employers might not be covered by the federal law that covers such agreements.

After all, since the Age Discrimination in Employment Act only applied to employers that have 20 or more employees, the requirements for a “knowing and voluntary waiver”

U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters
U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

Over the last few days, Twitter has been a-twittering with buzz that the Department of Labor has sent the final overtime rules to the OMB.

This is the equivalent of one department sending another one an e-mail with the new rules. Why? Because it’s just

TimeIn catching up over some interesting employment law cases from 2015, I came across Lennon v. Dolce Vida Medical Spa (download here).  You would be forgiven if you missed it because it’s an unreported Superior Court decision on a seemingly-technical issue.

But, if followed by other courts, it has a notable twist.

First, the

Last week, a story caught my eye and the attention of some of my colleagues.  As reported first by Bloomberg BNA, IBM has stopped providing the comparison information that is typically required in separation agreements for older workers under the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act.

You may be wondering how that is possible.  Robin

If you’re like most employers that do background checks, you probably haven’t thought twice about the documentation you use for it.

Perhaps you’ve copied some standard language you’ve found off the Internet (not that there is anything necessarily wrong with that), or maybe you’ve just used a form that has been handed down from one

Giving claims a final resting place

A few days ago, I came across a thoughtful post from Work Matters, a longtime blog run by Michael Maslanka.

In it, Mike describes a clause in a settlement agreement to get around an issue that sometimes arises — how do you minimize the

Throw out the release?

The situation is a common one.

  • Employer terminates the employment of an employee.
  • Employer provides a severance agreement with its signature already affixed. 
  • Employee signs it and returns the agreement to the employer.
  • Employer, likely reviewing just the signature, pays the severance.

But here’s where things get

The title of this post is, of course, a bit misleading.  Any lawyer will tell you that each employment case you may have is unique and that any settlement must take into account the facts and circumstances of the particular case.

All true.  And, if your company is negotiating a settlement, you ought to have