In the July/August issue of the Connecticut Lawyer magazine, attorney Joseph Blyskal has the first of a two-part article on the state of restrictive covenants in employment agreements in Connecticut.  I’ve talked about this several times before (most recently earlier this summer), but the Connecticut Lawyer article is recommended reading as well (it’s behind a

The New York Times this morning has an article that suggests that non-compete agreements are being used increasingly in a broader array of jobs.

Pick your fights carefully

His evidence? Well, the article doesn’t cite that.

Though, to the reporter’s credit, in noting the discussion going on in Massachusetts over legislation

Suppose your company just purchased another small company.  As is typical in such deals, you have hired the owners under a three year employment contract because the professional services and expertise of the owners is important to the deal’s success. In that arrangement, you have a restrictive covenant that says that if and when the

An article in this week’s Connecticut Law Tribune suggests “how employees can negotiate around a non-compete agreement.” 

But let’s look at the issue from the “other” side — the employer — and ask “how employers can enforce a non-compete agreement.” 

There are a number of factors that courts in Connecticut will look at in deciding

Suppose a former employee has breached your company’s covenant not to compete after she left employment.  Are you, the employer, entitled to get the non-compete period extended as a remedy for the breach?

Great question. And one that differs depending on the state.

A federal court in Connecticut (Aladdin Capital Holdings, LLC v. Donoyan

As social media continues to dominate the world — or at least conversations about employment law —  there are a few notable posts that are worth delving into this week that explore the topic further.