Memorial Day Weekend, in addition to a time of reflection and observance, is also a time when many of us look at our summer plans and figure out the next three months.

But like many of you, our summer plans have been cancelled. Kids aren’t going to camp. We’re not going on a trip. Even

“Come out to the coast, we’ll get together, have a few laughs”.  

Sounds like a plan for reopening businesses in Connecticut next week, right?

Well, that quote is from Bruce Willis’s character in one of my favorite movies, Die Hard. It might also be in peril if you are the same age as Bruce Willis

Updated 10:15a, May 9, 2020

Late Friday afternoon, Governor Lamont announced that Phase I reopenings will occur as soon as May 20, 2020.  These will include “non-essential” offices that had been closed, restaurants, retail stores and hair salons.  Early on Saturday, we also got all the detailed rules that will need to be met to

We are still “a few weeks” away from the time when Connecticut starts to relax the “Stay Safe. Stay Home” requirements.  (Officially, the rules are set to expire on May 20, 2020 and Governor Lamont has indicated that some businesses will reopen then.) But, beyond the recommendations of the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Board, which

Three months ago, on January 22, 2020, when I uploaded my first coronavirus pandemic post (and being one of the first law blogs to post about it substantively), a few people asked me why I already writing about this.

In part, it was because I had been listening to Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director

The Connecticut Appellate Court today ruled that an employer did not wrongfully discharge an employee who refused to participate in a return to work medical examination.  The Court held that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) allows for medical examinations in certain situations and that the employer was justified in asking for one in this case. 

In Joyner v.