When no one is working, no one needs to get paid leave.

But as the workforce starts returning, smaller businesses — particularly those will less than 50 employees — are starting to feel the impact of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

That law created two new paid leave provisions — the EPSLA and

To paraphrase a popular quote: There are years when nothing happens and there are days (and weeks) when years happen.

The nonstop barrage of news, orders, and other materials continues making updating a blog on the subject feel hopelessly out of date the moment you click “Publish”.

So rather than any lofty posts this

I’ve previously touched on a number of bills that were passed in the short legislative session that ended earlier this month but I thought I would recap the session briefly in one post.

Of course, the CBIA already did most of the work so I won’t repeat the good work and recommend the post to

With Congress in gridlock, we haven’t seen any federal laws impacting employment law for several years. Instead, we’ve now started to see a lot more action at the state legislative level where proposals to modify everything from family leave to the minimum wage are being passed in, it seems, increasing numbers.

Therefore, what happens in other states is becoming much more important.  For instance, we saw that Connecticut was considering an immigration-related employment bill that was modeled on laws in other states. 

Because of this, and because many employers now have businesses in multiple states, I’ve asked my friend, Courtney Ward-Reichard, a shareholder at Nilan Johnson Lewis in Minneapolis, to share her insights about a pretty broad employment law bill that was just signed into law earlier this week in Minnesota.  While Connecticut already has adopted some of these items, others may be on the horizon, such as lowering the employee threshhold for family leave to 20 or more employees. After all, if one state has passed it, propoants can argue that Connecticut’s passage won’t put us as a competitive disadvantage when compared with similar states. 

In any event, my thanks to Courtney for her insights here.

On May 11, 2014, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton signed landmark legislation – a group of bills that became known as the Women’s Economic Security Act (“WESA”). WESA will most directly affect employers with operations and employees in Minnesota. But employers in Connecticut and elsewhere should take note: this legislation – or its components – may well serve as a model in other states.

Here are the most significant changes:

• Creates new protected class for familial status: WESA expands the Minnesota Human Rights Act (“MHRA”) by adding familial status as a new protected class. Employers will likely face new state charges and lawsuits alleging discrimination on the basis of this status, and victorious plaintiffs may seek not only damages, but also their attorneys’ fees. This expansion makes Minnesota unusual, as federal law and most states’ laws do not include familial status as a protected class. This change became effective the day after Governor Dayton signed the bill.

• Expands pregnancy and parenting leave: Covered employers (with over 20 employees) must provide up to twelve weeks of unpaid leave to eligible employees for: 1) the birth or adoption of a child; or 2) prenatal care, or incapacity due to pregnancy, childbirth, or related health conditions (for female employees). Employees may take the first type of leave within twelve months of the birth/after the child leaves the hospital. These changes will be effective July 1, 2014, and will affect numerous employers who are not covered by the federal FMLA. Employers will be allowed to require employees to use their sick leave during parental leave, and the leave will also run concurrently with any FMLA leave.


Continue Reading Guest Post: Women’s Economic Security Act May Serve As Model for Other States

It’s finally here: Paid Sick Leave.

Connecticut officially became the first state in the nation to mandate this on Sunday.  Depending on your perspective, it’s either a historic achievement or another sign that Connecticut is anti-business.

I’ve talked about this extensively over the last six months so I’m not going to repeat the summaries here.

We continue with our series of posts (see prior posts here, here, here, and here) on the new Paid Sick Leave Guidance issued by the Connecticut Department of Labor earlier this month. Today’s post focuses on the “carryover” rules.

Another issue that the Paid Sick Leave addresses is the “carryover” rules —

Employers in Connecticut have less than two months to get ready before the new Paid Sick Leave law goes into effect. If only that were the only new development.

Visits to the Doctor's Office May be Covreed

A few months ago, my firm held a sold-out seminar to address these new developments and much more. Because of overwhelming demand, we are putting on that complimentary program again on December 1, 2011 in Norwalk, CT.  Space and attendance is limited.

For more information, contact my firm at (203) 330-2059 or via e-mail at seminar@pullcom.com and someone will get back to you.   This program is geared to private employers, their in-house counsel, and HR representatives so keep that in mind.

In addition to the educational component, we have two excellent speakers as well: Chris Bruhl, President and CEO of the Business Council of Fairfield County, will be the breakfast speaker and Deputy Labor Commissioner Dennis Murphy will be our lunch speaker.

Here are the particulars:


Continue Reading Paid Sick Leave and What Employers Need to Know: A Seminar

This morning, I had the opportunity to speak to a group of some pretty smart people in the hospitality industry about Connecticut’s Paid Sick Leave law, which goes into effect on January 1, 2012.  After all, with the movie Contagion as the nation’s number one movie, sickness is something on people’s minds.

(I’ve previously